How do brokers match buyers and sellers using the bid/ask prices? Why are orders sometimes partially filled? How does that happen? Is there a way to avoid the double fees? - Seedly

Investments

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DBS Vickers Securities

Asked by Anonymous

Asked on 15 Apr 2019

How do brokers match buyers and sellers using the bid/ask prices? Why are orders sometimes partially filled? How does that happen? Is there a way to avoid the double fees?

If I place a buy/sell order to sell 1000 shares of a particular stock, but only 100 is bought/sold that day, $25 fee will be charged. So to buy/sell the remaining 900, I will have to pay another $25 fee, is that right? Is there a way to buy/sell the 1000 shares as a whole (so either 1000 or 0) to prevent the double fees? Or maybe reduce the chance of it happening? And how do brokers match buyers and sellers or decide which orders get filled first? Thanks in advance! P.s I am using DBS Vickers

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Yes. If partial order is filled, it is considered 1 trade, and you will be charged full commission.

If you want to buy/sell the 1000 shares without partial order then you have to buy up or sell down. If you queue then you risk the partial order.

This usually happen when people want to try and save on that 1 bid and queue at a better pricing to save on that little bit but end up partial order.

Another way to avoid partial order is DON'T trade low liquidity stocks.

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Question Poster

15 Apr 2019

Ah I didn't see any fill or kill option. I'll go look at it again, thanks :)
Gabriel Tham
Gabriel Tham

15 Apr 2019

Yes, in your example, to avoid partial fill buy at 10.60 or sell at 10.50. If u order buy at 10.50, you must queue up. For low liquidity counter, sure to end up in partial.
Jansen Ng
Jansen Ng, Business Student at Ntu

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Level 4. Prodigy
Updated on 07 Jun 2019

I have a sub question. If the orders are split across various timings of the day, eg out of 1000 shares, 500 is bought in the morning but rest 500 is bought in the afternoon, is it just one commission?

Does it make a difference if i put in a buy at 500 shares in the morning and it got throught, then i separately put in another 500 shares in the afternoon and it got through in that same day?

ps im using poems

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Gabriel Tham
Gabriel Tham

15 Apr 2019

Most brokers will amalgamate the orders. Meaning you can do multiple buy orders in a single day of the SAME stock and SAME order type and be charged 1 commission. Do double confirm with the particular broker. POEMS should be fine.
Jansen Ng
Jansen Ng

15 Apr 2019

Ahh thanks!