What are some factors to consider when looking for a job? - Seedly
 

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Asked by Anonymous

Asked on 11 Aug 2018

What are some factors to consider when looking for a job?

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Dawn Fiona
Dawn Fiona
Level 6. Master
Answered on 14 Aug 2018

Depends on you!

For me, I focus on skills and experience. What do I want to learn? What job will give me that? In the early days of my career, salary was secondary - in fact, I graduated with higher credentials and an experienced portfolio than many of my peers, but accepted a lower starting pay for my first job than most of them, because learning > money to me back then.

Of course, today I value and look for different things, more intangible ones. How's the company culture like? Do they value my work and contributions? Do they micro-manage? How are their KPIs measured and is it fair? Who will be my boss and how is she / he like? (having a good boss is VERY important). Will the pay be enough to feed my family and save for the future? Etc.

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Lee

2d ago

I would say that there are several factors that one may consider, but ultimately it is dependent on your current and future needs/desires. Some factors include: Career growth Salary Work/Life balance e.g. night shifts, week ends Accessibility Company culture Passion e.g. does the description job match up with what you want to do? Doing something that you like will to make work fun
Leong Wen Fong
Leong Wen Fong
Level 7. Grand Master
Answered on 13 Aug 2018

I believe that there is no one answer to your question. Everyone's value system is different. When I started looking for a job, I wanted to learn more about Fintech, and experience to me, was more important than salary. So I prioritized according to the industry, and gave more allowance to a lower pay.

Another person might be carrying a bigger financial burden (eg. supporting family, paying off loans, paying for studies), then the pay would take a much higher priority than his interest.

There are suveys done however, that good bosses retain employees better than pure passion or the high salary of a job! So just something to think about!

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If it is my first job, I will take any job that pays a reasonable salary for the work that I do to do. While doing so, I will take the opportunity to improve my knowledge, skills, and experience.

When I outgrow my role and the company is not doing anything to help me move to the next level (be it money or personal growth), then it is time to move on.

Continue the process everytime until you realise what you like to do for a lifetime. Then pursue it for the rest of your life. =)

Here is everything about me and what I do best.

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Larissa Lim
Larissa Lim
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered 2d ago

Hello, there are a few factors you could consider:

Scale of company - SME; you have the opportunity to know/do more. MNCs; more specific role

Types of role - what can you learn, what skills you could pick up

Team you are working in - who is your reporting officer

Company Culture - you could get the feel when you enter the office

Location of company - If you spend more than 1.5 hr travelling, thats 3 hr a day and will be a big no no for me.

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Choon Yuan Chan
Choon Yuan Chan
Level 7. Grand Master
Answered 3d ago

1) Culture,

2) Job progression (many people claim they contended with low level position by many after a few years lament never get promotion/progression),

3) Ask around about the culture, some companies have a bad culture where they do bell curve system and cut off their bottom 5-10% of their workforce like some local ride hailing firms. It gives very little stability and a culture where departments will have inter rivalry and you can get killed on the job

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Junus Eu
Junus Eu
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Nov)

Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered 3d ago

It depends on individual preference, which also changes with stage of life.

For example, for a fresh grad coming out, you might want to focus on learning opportunities more than chasing a high salary.

For a married person with kids, you might want to look for more stability and higher salary.

For most people after some time working, you would be looking for culture and a work environment that works for you.

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For a first job, I would not focus on the salary at all, it has to be reasonable, but I am more concerned about

  • What I can learn from the job

  • What skills can I pick up

  • What kind of responsibilities will I be given

  • What kind of progression will I have a chance to be part of

  • Will I have opportunities for global exposure?

Largely because when one is starting a career, you are very likely not to know what kind of job you want to do, an engineer can do many things, but may take some time to find his niche.

For a 2nd job and onwards

  • Is this a job that will bring me satisfaction?

  • Is the salary at least matching my skills and experience?

  • Who are the people I will be working with?

Office politics can make or break your job, so tread with caution. It is totally possible that it's harder to navigate office politics than the actual job itself!

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Jasmine Tay
Jasmine Tay
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered 3d ago

For a first job, I would priotise learning and growth potential and a good boss that's willing to open up opportunities in the workplace for you.

Once you've garnered the skills and experience, then I think you would have more room to prioritise other factors such as salary, culture, benefits etc

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Jeff Yeo
Jeff Yeo, amateur Social contributor at School of social sharing
Level 7. Grand Master
Answered on 12 Oct 2018

Working culture

  • work from anywhere at any time or strict 9-5

  • workaholic culture or relaxed

salary

  • paid 12 months or over 13 ?

  • commission or variable bonus

location

  • 3 hours on the road daily to get to and from work ? You might be tired out

Growth

  • what can one learn from the role

  • can you move up ?

  • can you move to another department

  • Your current role should help you move to a new job

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JianHao Soo
JianHao Soo
Level 5. Genius
Answered on 19 Sep 2018

Progression and pay increament also matters quite a bit. The skills you learnt and how it can boost your future career matters more for me.

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Yong Kah Hwee
Yong Kah Hwee
Level 8. Wizard
Answered on 18 Sep 2018
  1. Culture (it plays a huge part on whether you like the place or not)

  2. Room for growth

  3. Pay

  4. Colleagues/friends

  5. Your level of interest

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Agree with Jin Shun Chia totally! Do something that you like, and learn to make money from doing that. Because you like the work, you are more likely to become very good at it, and eventually make a lot of money from it. I believe most successful people use this model.

The average people unfortunately, dream of their retirement because they hate what they do. They thinnk when they are eventually financial independent, they can finally do what they like. This model usually don't work. Because the average guy doing what they hate don't usually achieve financial independent before 60. So they will be spending their whole working life doing things they don't like.

Do what you like, and you will be retired from age 25!

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Charmaine Ng
Charmaine Ng, The Code Breaker at @ Every Chye Peng Stall
Level 6. Master
Answered on 16 Aug 2018

Hi, a few questions to ask yourself first. What are you looking for? Is this your first job or are you bored in your current job? Otherwise, are you looking to try something new in terms of job scope or industry?

When going for first job it's always better to be in a place where you can grow. Money is probably secondary at this point since it is all about the learning experience and skills to takeaways. When at a more experienced level; money and title comes into the picture because you're probably at the stage for marriage and family commitment too. At different stages people have different needs so it really depends on you (or perhaps you can give more context).

Most importantly is at every job you do you learn something and develop a new skillet be it hard or soft skills to keep yourself valuable.

Hope this helps!

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Eric Chia
Eric Chia, Senior Financial Consultant at Prudential
Level 6. Master
Answered on 16 Aug 2018

Find something that you enjoy doing, because you'll be spending half of your life working.

And work out how much money you need. You'll need to find work that can provide money that you need too!

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