Asked by Anonymous

My son, at 13, has begun selling in-game items for very high prices (gaming accounts at more than $100, in-game items for $30+). Should I be encouraging this?

I know that some of the people who buy from him are students using their parents money. On one hand, I a little proud of him being able to make money on his own. On the other hand, he spends more and more time on these games, and I don't really want to encourage young people to spend their parent's money on games

0
0
Answer this question
Add
Add
Select
Clear
Add
Write your answer

Answers (7)

Sort by:
Most Upvote
  • Most Recent
  • Most Upvote
  • Bang Hong
    Bang Hong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    I am one of the old guys whom was a kid and did similar stuff like what your son did (My era was Maplestory, Gunbound, Conquer Online, Dragonica, Pokemon gameboy trading, etc...).

    I don't earn money from gaming, I do show people how to complete or how to game with some strategy, (i.e. God of War, WOW, etc).

    To me it is a journey of growing up with games. I would sugggest you as a parent can monitor him from far. Do give gentle reminder or advises at times but don't be too controlling.

    I need to understand the right context of "spends more and more time on these game", how much is "more" ? Personally last time I do game average 4-5 hours daily during the 56k dial up era and on holidays I game 8- 10 hours, sometimes 10-15 hours too.

    I got no comments on "I dont really want to encourage young people to spend their parent's money on games". Because this is their choice, if they don't spend on your son's loot they will spend on else where. For example, you cant limit which shop sell liquor. If one shop doesn't sell, you go to the next. An anology.

    Just sharing my experience here, if your son isn't doing anything really "bad" or neglect his studies "completely", it is a journey.

    I paid a price for this journey by having an extra year in Secondary school, but thinking back I will still do the same thing in my own way again.

    Comments (0)
    2
    0
  • Justin Kieran Ong
    Justin Kieran Ong
    Level 3. Wonderkid
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    I am answer thing this from the viewpoint of a gamer.

    While he is monetizing his hobbies, do keep an eye on how long he spends doing it. Remind him that he has other priorities.

    Another point to note is what he is selling and how he gets the items. If he is earning the items with his own hard work then it's good and all but if he is buying the items and selling them for a higher price or putting it up for auction to the highest bidder it may be time to step in before it becomes something like the CS GO lotto.

    Also, Korea just legally criminalized game boosting where you pay someone else to level up your character.

    Comments (4)
    1
    0
    View 2 more comments
    • Leong Wen Fong
      ): I thought Daniel and I found a friend hahaha
      17 Dec 2018
    • Loh Tat Tian
      Overwatch? Hmm there is a community that plays it competitively. But sadly I stop at hearthstone and focus on FIRE
      20 Dec 2018
  • Daniel Ling
    Daniel Ling
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    As long as his not using this earning capability to spend more time on games.

    It's a lesson on playing the market. Good if you can teach him the perspective as well as how to handle the wealth.

    Comments (0)
    1
    0
  • Adriel Thin
    Adriel Thin
    Level 3. Wonderkid
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    I think it's a perfect opportunity for him to learn entrepreneurship. Instead of discouraging him, perhaps help him understand the economics of it. If he thinks he is running a business, perhaps help him calculate how much he is earning per hour of gaming instead of the absolute value. If the amount of money he is making per hour is low, you could persuade him to reconsider spending so much time on the games as it could be giving very low returns. Alternatively, perhaps help him think of ways in which he can expand his 'business', such as through derivatives like making money from walkthroughs or streams (Robert Kiyosaki). Other lessons could include the cost of running a business, such as making him buy the hardware using his own money and paying for some portion of the electricity bill as part of "overhead costs". Some of these lessons could be very valuable and something not taught in schools.

    As for other children spending their parents' money, it is something that's out of yours and your son's control. Even if your son does not sell his products, those children will be spending the money elsewhere. Having said that, if your son is spending more and more time on games and neglecting other areas of his life such as studies and social life, then a good talk to grant him some perspective would be useful. Ultimately, I think this is a valuable opportunity for your son to learn some lessons about entrepreneurship, specifically about opportunity costs and return on investment of time.

    Comments (0)
    0
    0
  • Elsa Goh
    Elsa Goh
    Level 5. Genius
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    Seedly people generally likes to encourage enterpreneurism, but i have the following concerns.

    Some concerns here. 1. Is it illegal or grey market? 2. Is he spending money on this pursuit? Or buying ingame currency or cryptocurrency with cash? 3. Is he likely to get scammed or preyed upon? (Money, or socially) 4. Is he spending too much time on mining and farming to create these accounts?

    If the answers to all of the above are no, then should be fine. But honestly idk anything about this market, so perhaps you should try and find someone who has experience.

    As to your customers' ethics, don't overthink it. It is not your responsibility to police their spending habits. Your concern can actually be applied to all products sold by merchants, whose ultimate aim is to get people to buy their products... consider toys and kids' games.

    Comments (0)
    0
    0
  • Npm Adele
    Npm Adele
    Level 3. Wonderkid
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    Kudos to his entrepreneurial spirit. Can get him to think about profits vs ethics. Maybe not so much for games but if he were CEO of a company manufacturing a life saving drug etc. Just spark a conversation and nurture that critical thinking?:)

    Comments (0)
    0
    0
  • Gabriel Tham
    Gabriel Tham
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Apr)

    Level 8. Wizard
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018

    Good boy!! If you notice the in game market is like stock market. There also can learn economics, like supply and demand.

    Of course play too much no good la...

    Comments (0)
    0
    0