I was recently promoted, but I keep making mistakes in my new responsibilities. My colleagues are also much more experienced than me. Should I ask to go back to my original position? - Seedly
 

Career

Asked by Anonymous

Asked on 22 Nov 2018

I was recently promoted, but I keep making mistakes in my new responsibilities. My colleagues are also much more experienced than me. Should I ask to go back to my original position?

I was promoted 3 months ago, because my review was very good, and my boss felt I could handle more. He seems to be regretting that decision though

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Grace Cong
Grace Cong
Level 5. Genius
Answered on 24 Nov 2018

3 months is not enough time to establish your competence in a new position. Talk to your manager, work with them to create a 6 month action plan to develop your weak areas and enhance your strengths. Foster a good working relationship with your more experienced colleagues and ask them for tips on how to improve. Show them you're willing to learn and prove that you deserve that promotion. Self-doubt can often lead to self-sabotage so be careful about that. Good luck and keep going!

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In a healthy work environment, your colleagues more familiar with the tasks in your new role should help you.

But let's work on things that you can control. Why are you making the mistakes? What could help you make less mistakes?

Do you need specific training? Then ask your boss for the training. Or ask your colleagues nicely for help.

Are the new instructions tricky to follow? Sometimes old SOPs passed down from long ago can be confusing. Would it help to set aside time to come up with an updated SOP or a checklist? (Updating such stuff for the organisation could prove to be another boost for your performance review)

Are you learning from your mistakes? This could be very task-dependent so I'm just making general statements. If yes then you're fine, hang in there. If not, i honestly don't think going back to the old role is a good idea because your boss obviously thinks you're better than that. Is there a lateral role that might suit you better? Same "level" of stuff that you're doing after promotion, but you may be better at that. If so, maybe ask for some exposure and consider a transfer?

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Good Day Every Day
Good Day Every Day
Level 7. Grand Master
Answered on 27 Nov 2018

Don't give up! It is only 3 months. Learn from your mistakes and move on. Continue to learn and you will have more experience in the future. The hawker selling char kway teo also took years to perfect his skills in order to attract the crowd. Give yourself time and space to learn.

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Casey Choo
Casey Choo
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 25 Nov 2018

Ask & you shall recieve.

Regardless of career positions, ask for help if you need! People are generally more willing to lend a helping hand if they sense a geniune question!

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Elsa Goh
Elsa Goh
Level 6. Master
Updated on 24 Nov 2018

Can one. Just do your best and it will work out. Dun worry!

Edit: btw u are not alone. Most of us suffer from lack of confidence occasionally - up to 70% in fact according to scientists! Check this out:

https://www.google.com.sg/amp/amp.timeinc.net/time/5312483/how-to-deal-with-impostor-syndrome

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Lok Yang Teng
Lok Yang Teng
Level 8. Wizard
Answered on 22 Nov 2018

I've recently read about the Peter Principle: “every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence”. It is satire and mocks management systems. Economists Alan Benson, Danielle Li and Kelly Shue published a paper which which provided evidence that the best salespeople were more likely to be promoted, and that they were then terrible managers. The better they had been in sales, the worse their teams performed once they arrived in a managerial role. Don't feel dejected about your inabilities, it could be due to skills mismatch. Take sometime to adjust to your new position, and you can always seek help from your colleagues and prove your boss wrong!

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