How much do I need to invest in dividend stocks to get a monthly recurring income of S$1,000? - Seedly
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Anonymous

Asked on 30 Oct 2019

How much do I need to invest in dividend stocks to get a monthly recurring income of S$1,000?

I want to go on sabbatical leave for a year and hope to have some recurring income just to pay some bills. I currently have around S$150,000 cash in hand, but I don't want to use that sum of money to pay the bills. I was hoping to only spend the balance earned from dividends and leave the capital untouched.

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Realistically, you'll need around 8% yield to achieve $1k/mth on your investments. This only leave high yield bonds, and REITs that can achieve such a payout (unless you leverage, but that's another topic entirely, unless you want to explore it). Your capital will also be subject to market movements.

You might find that deploying $145K @ 5% will yield you $7.25K and the remaining $5K that you didn't invest can be spread over 12 months to make up the difference to $1k/mth, and that might be a better way of managing it, since you'll (hopefully) go back to work after a year and saving $5K back up shouldn't take too long. Better to play safe than worry about your leveraged investments moving against you due to market movements.

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Question Poster

31 Oct 2019

Ohh thank youu, seems like a good alternative as well!
Elijah Lee
Elijah Lee

31 Oct 2019

Hi, you can look at it this way, after you return to work, a year's worth of dividends will restore the $5K you had to tap on. So there's no real need to leverage your portfolio.
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You'll need an 8% yield from your 150k portfolio to receive 12k/yr.

This is a difficult yield to achieve. If you are willing to take the risk, one of the only ways to achieve this would be to leverage on income products like bonds, annuities, property funds.

This comes with fluctuating interest rates and possibly fluctuating yields based on the product you choose.

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Sudhan
Sudhan
Level 6. Master
Answered on 30 Oct 2019

Hi Anonymous, it's advisable to only use money you don't need in the next five years to invest in the stock market. If you need the money in the next five years or so, it might be better to leave them in the bank or in safe instruments such as Singapore Savings Bonds, even though they have low yields.

Once you have that sorted out, you can look into investing the money into the stock market. Like Gabriel mentioned, you would need to invest S$240,000 if you like to receive S$12,000 per year, assuming the portfolio dividend yield is 5%. More info here. Hope this helps.

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Rachel Yeo
Rachel Yeo

31 Oct 2019

This is great Sudhan!! :)
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The second row of the table in the linked article below.

$150k would need something yielding 8% which sounds a bit challenging in this day and age.

https://blog.seedly.sg/dividend-investing-how-much-you-need-to-invest-passive-income

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Lee Jiahui
Lee Jiahui
Level 6. Master
Answered on 31 Oct 2019

Not realistic... I may not be perfect but I can share my experiment. I was getting 1k/mth with 400k capital i.e. 3% p.a. this was based on the allocation of 50% cash in hurdle accounts, SSB, FD fetching avg 2%, and 50% stocks (of which 25% REITs, 50% blue chips) fetching avg 4%. Even then my stock paper value fluctuates + - 10% = + - 20k.

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31 Oct 2019

Thank you for sharing your experience!
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Eric Ong
Eric Ong, Project Analyst at 8Bit Global
Level 6. Master
Answered on 30 Oct 2019

To achieve that,

you may have to achieve an investment yield of at least S$12,000 / S$150,000 = 8%

The required yield is high, but ain't achievable. Click the link to find out how

https://wealthpark.io/articles/best-dividend-stocks-and-how-to-find-them-1-2-three-things-to-never-miss-out/

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Hey,

You might want to take a look at Royal Dutch Shell which is paying about 11% in dividend right now. Good stuff to be added as part of your portfolio.

As for high yield bonds and income funds, right now is definitely not a god buy. You may want to take a look at US blue chip Tech and Financial institutions for now.​​​

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Gabriel Tham
Gabriel Tham, Tag Team Member at Kenichi Tag Team
Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered on 30 Oct 2019

Assuming a conservative 5% per annum, you need $240k

Let's say you can achieve 7% per annum, you need about $172k

And let's say you are a super good investor achieving 10% yield a year! You need $120k

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Frankie Rappaport
Frankie Rappaport
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Aug)

Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered on 05 Mar 2020

Here is a table for different yield (not guaranteed, must look for appropriate candidates)

https://cdn-blog.seedly.sg/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/31121447/Dividend-you-need-in-your-portfolio.png

When You would be investing 150000 SGD and be receiving a yearly dividend distribution

of 4% (which already is high all fees and risks considered)

that would make You 500 SGD a month, not much, though for living.

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Fergus Tan
Fergus Tan, Senior Partner at Vision Advisory Management
Level 5. Genius
Answered on 31 Oct 2019

Is $1k a month income sufficient to go on sabbatical?

There are many routes for you to do it, and there are basically 3 main angles to approach.

1) Portfolio risk

2) Portfolio leverage

3) Drawdown

Just from the numbers, to get $12k annual income, you need to achieve 8% per annum from a $150k portfolio..

Portfolio risk means you need to see the asset class to invest in, in order to get the monthly income. Example, if you were to look simply at equity dividends, very likely you are going to get somewhere between 3% to 6% per annum. If you were to look at good bonds, it would be around 1 to 3% per annum. However, you could look at high yield corporate bonds. For example, some Indonesian bonds may offer up to 8 to 10% per annum. But should you be investing 150k there? I don't think so. Likewise, if you were to do options writing, it's possible to get a premium payout of 2 to 4% per month. But this means you may not get back the capital that you put in since the risk is conversion into equity at a lower price. But it will give you the monthly income paid out.

Portfolio leverage is another factor. For example, if you were able to get $100k in a personal loan through balance transfers, it is possible to put this to work at a higher rate than the interest you are paying for it. Example, I recently got offered 6 months balance transfer from Citibank at 1.1% per annum, and no processing fee. It's possible to get a 12 months one too. Hypothetically, if you are even able to get a 4% dividend payout, you are positive in ROI. The risk is that your capital is not guaranteed, and at the end of 12 months when you have to repay the loan, you might have to use up your cash capital to cover any losses in investment.

Example, let's say you buy into a basket of assets, which pay a blended 5%. You use $150k cash, and $150k loan (at 2% per annum interest to make it simple).

So you buy $300k of assets, which will pay $15,000 of dividends. You need to pay interest of $3,000. This means you have a cash flow of $12,000. At the end of the 12 months, your $300k of assets drop to $280k for example. You still need to return $150k of loan, thus your capital left is $130k. Of course, it's possible for your investments to be invested in something safer, but please note that in almost any investment that does more than 4% dividend payout, it is unlikely to be guaranteed in the short term.

Thirdly, your option is to do a capital drawdown. For example, if your blended portfolio is 6% dividend yield. This gives 9000 in dividends. You are still short of $3k, or around 250 a month. You will then sell off assets progressively to cover the shortfall, but it means at the end of 12 months, you are likely to have less than $150k. That's again taking into account that your investments are volatile and you won't get back the $150k anyway.

Cheers!

Fergus

PS: Need more specific advice on your situation? Feel free to reach out to me on Instagram https://rplg.co/fergusig

Or you can find me on facebook in the Seedly Facebook group!

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