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  • Asked by Kenneth Lou

    Leong Wen Fong
    Leong Wen Fong, Community Lead at Seedly
    125 Answers, 290 Upvotes
    Answered 1d ago
    If I were the one spending, then definitely the picnic. I think staycation everywhere would be overpriced, and I rather save up for overseas holidays. Unfortunately there are not a lot of places in SG where you can actually see the stars. That being said, if it were sponsored then of course I'll take the staycation, cos I'm a #trueblueSingaporean that loves free stuff too
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Gabriel Tham
    Gabriel Tham, Kenichi Tag Team Member at Tag Team

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    415 Answers, 742 Upvotes
    Answered 14h ago
    It is very hard to say. We have been in a super low interest rate environment globally, with more money printing than ever. However, I do think that for Singapore's growth it has already peaked and will not be able to sustain the same level of economic growth as past generations. This means that the ability of our state investment funds to grow is very limited. There must be a sustainable rate of growth to give out guaranteed CPF interests and in the current state, even a guaranteed 4% is extremely extremely rare.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Brandan Chen
    Brandan Chen, Financial Planner at Manulife Singapore
    148 Answers, 217 Upvotes
    Answered 1d ago
    I do agree that we tend to spend more/faster when moving towards cashless. More disciplined required when it comes to spending. An example will be my gf (choose not to own a single credit card), who makes it a point to go to the ATM to withdraw S$100 every sunday. This S$100 will last her for the entire week till Sunday, including meals, transport and any daily expenses. She did explain that it helps her to save more as she finds it a hassle to withdraw money from ATM, and also the psychological factor that the money in your wallet is decreasing and you need the money to last for X number of remaining days.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy
    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    277 Answers, 468 Upvotes
    Answered 10h ago
    You can purchase stocks, gold, Unit Trusts, ILPs. My recommendation would be to invest in a globally diversified portfolio with asset allocation according to your age and investment horizon using funds. You can speak to an FA like myself to set one up. It's cheaper now to invest using CPF then ever before and it's still quite possible to achieve a projected 6-8% returns per annum over a 10-20 year horizon from the approved fund list provided by CPF themselves. I've selected 6 of them to create such a global portfolio for my clients. The best part about investing your CPF is that, if at any time, there is a worry for an impending recession, you can always exit your positions and go back to earning a 2.5% interest on your OA.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Gabriel Tham
    Gabriel Tham, Kenichi Tag Team Member at Tag Team

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    415 Answers, 742 Upvotes
    Answered 14h ago
    They are all doing not so well. Singtel being bogged down by its huge investment in Bharti Airtel India. Starhub undergoing massive business transformation. Profits down, dividends cut. M1 losing ARPU and the price war is hurting it. Plus, the incoming TPG, the current circles.life promos will all add up into more competition in an already super saturated market. Sooner or later there will be a consolidation. A small population in Singapore will have limited people on data plans, any price war will hurt revenues.
  • Asked by Leong Wen Fong

    Wynn Teo
    Wynn Teo
    1 Answers, 25 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    火气四射 This is the hottest cny.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Yeo Enk Loui
    Yeo Enk Loui
    5 Answers, 11 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    Personally, I am a small retail investor in Funding Societies, having invested approximately $500 in the platform. I think it is good in the sense it gives you a relatively high return (~10% on average) for your investment (assuming the firm does not default on its loans) and hence this could be a stable source of passive income. Having said that, some P2P lending platforms diversify the investor's risk by limiting the maximum investment from each investor (For example: An investor may be only to invest up to $50 for an Invoice Financing with a loan tenor of 90 days @12% returns per annum). This equates to an approximate return of $1.50 in 3 months and if you think about it from a liquidity perspective. While the annualised return seems attractive, the actual benefits are only "realised" when you invest in a substantial amount of loans on a continual basis. Given the illiquid nature of the loan, while it may "good" in terms of diversifying your portfolio, it can be perceived as "bad" as it means forgoing the opportunity to indulge in say $50 of whatever you love for the next 3 months and getting a mere $1.50 (before accounting for administrative fees).
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Yeo Enk Loui
    Yeo Enk Loui
    5 Answers, 11 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    Hey there! Just to add another perspective to your question! When you mentioned " So essential its like parking your money in a long term 'bond'/perpetual and getting coupon of X%/yr.", you are right in the sense if company has constant and sustainable dividend pay-out ratio. However, one fundamental difference between bonds and equities is that for equity owners, you are entitled to the residual earnings of the company in the form of dividend payments (which also means that you may get none if the company did not do well financially). On the other hand, bond holders are entitled to fixed income in the form of interest payments. On this note, the returns for bonds is irregardless of the stock price but it is erraneous to assume that dividend yield is tantamount to "a long term 'bond'/perpetual and getting coupon of X%/yr."
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy
    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    277 Answers, 468 Upvotes
    Answered 14h ago
    At least 100k more. But expect it to be closer to 300k.
  • Asked by Natalie Huang

    Hariz Arthur Maloy
    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    277 Answers, 468 Upvotes
    Answered 1d ago
    Hi Natalie, you can buy Unit Trusts for free online. Banks charge a fee as they're the one giving the recommendation. But also, buying unit trust is not a one time and forget thing. You use UTs as a means to build a sustainable balanced portfolio. And you'll usually use 3-6 funds to achieve global diversification and asset allocation. Instead of buying from a bank who may not be handling portfolio allocation and management, you can choose to DIY online or instead get from a Financial Advisor. An FA uses UTs to build portfolios, rebalance, adjust weightage in sectors based on market outlooks. That's a much better reason to pay a fee.
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