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  • Asked by Anonymous

    Depends on what you like. I've had colleagues who do well with carrots & celery in NZ company culture and for all others; chocolate do the trick (dark choc with at least 70% solids are healthy and good combo especially with almond). Most important thing is look at labels and don't get anything processed if you're looking for healthy snacks. If nuts is an option for you; simply swing by cold storage for their selection by weight (the type you can select and weigh accordingly). I find it more affordable than nuts specialty shops and those packaged version seems to always be of sugarcoated or salt laden option. Otherwise if cookies are your calling(mine is), try to find your neighbourhood if there are any bakeries with healthier options.

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Gabriel Tham, Keyboard Warrior at SkyNet
    143 Answers, 264 Upvotes

    Here are some differences and comparisons for the brokerages https://blog.seedly.sg/the-ultimate-cheatsheet-cheapest-stock-brokerage-in-singapore/

  • Asked by Anonymous

    SG Budget Babe
    53 Answers, 104 Upvotes

    Unfortunately that's how insurance works :( which is why buying early when one is healthy is SO important, but very few people think about insurance when they're healthy, sadly! 1. Alternatives would be government-led insurance such as MediShield Life. However, it is mostly insufficient if CI hits again. 2. Another option is that of moratorium underwriting, where you do not need to make health declaration but instead survive a waiting period imposed by the insurer. If no treatments, medication or symptoms of your pre-existing condition appears during this time, then your application may be approved. Unfortunately, this practice is not common in Singapore among most insurers. 3. Another resort would be that of international health insurers, some of whom provide coverage for pre-existing illnesses BUT they're often very very expensive! Therefore I think the best alternative would be to self-insure i.e. save up and/or grow your money to cover your own costs.

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Yixiong Chang
    2 Answers, 2 Upvotes

    Do not buy insurance through an agent, whether they are independent or not. Buy direct insurance. You can get 30-50% cheaper for the same coverage. Go for plain vanila critical illness plan, the fanciful 'multiple payout', or 'early critical illness' are not worth it. Also on how much protection u will need? As much as it makes yourself comfortable (comfortable with the amount of payout and premium that you have to pay). Depending on what 'critical illness' and the severity of it, recovery time can vary. If the illness takes 1-2years of recovery time, in addition you will lose the opportunity cost that you could have gain at work (promotion chances etc) Even if you managed to recover, your physical state might not be as before, so what will be future opportunity cost lost? 2yrs+2yr+3yrs? Just a reference for you if u really need a logical estimation. If you would like to learn more, ping me at my https://www.facebook.com/s1bearz

  • Asked by Junda

    So this may not be for everyone. This is something I'm building capital for in the meanwhile. (I'm writing this on my phone so there will be no paragraph spaces - I've tried, it doesn't work) Fastest money > Fast Money > Slow Money > Guaranteed Money I'll be putting majority of my capital into personal businesses first. My own startup, my self employed career as an IFA, & investing into franchises and other businesses. This I hope to compound at 50 - 200% in 3 to 5 years. Since I know business doesn't last forever, I'll take my dividends to reinvest in business expansion and to invest in a globally diversified portfolio using mutual funds. I'm an advisor myself so I dont pay myself a sales charge or an advisor fee (a bit cheat lah I know). Then in my 40s I will build a dividend paying portfolio for cashflow and financial independence. And finally in my 50s, I'll convert a majority of my assets into an Annuity for Life plus insurance for legacy planning. I will not invest in property as they become liabilities at an old age and don't usually retain the desired estate value when you die.

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Lou
    106 Answers, 211 Upvotes

    I would consider using Robo-advisors... It gives you a model portfolio of overseas ETFs which allow you to invest in a low cost manner. However, word of advice! Be ready to stomach market movements up and down and also, think about the longer term! (eg 10 years) Also, please read in detail what the ETFs comprises of before investing (they will give you a breakdown of the ETFs that your portfolio comprises of eg. US, Asia Ex-Japan, Etc.) But I would highly recommend you to read a few things: - The intro to Robo-advisors in Singapore: https://blog.seedly.sg/singapore-robo-advisor-investment-comparison/ - For you to read real reviews of Robo-advisors: https://seedly.sg/reviews/robo-advisors show less

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Gabriel Tham, Keyboard Warrior at SkyNet
    143 Answers, 264 Upvotes

    If your shares are kept by CDP, check CDP for shareholdings. If you change broker, shares in CDP are not affected. When you open a brokerage, all they do is link up to CDP. In fact, you can have multiple brokerage at the same time linking to 1 CDP account. To keep track I suggest use a third party portfolio tracker or just log in CDP. Brokerage do not bear responsibility to keep track of all your shares in CDP. If you want DBS to reflect your shares, you have to manually key in your portfolio into their platform. You can actually buy in OCBC and sell in DBS. Because all transaction goes through CDP, so even if DBS or OCBC does not reflect your portfolio, the shares are still in CDP.

  • Asked by Shareen Teo

    Alan Seng, Team Lead at Tech in Asia
    3 Answers, 6 Upvotes

    What about cryptocurrency exchanges? As a business model, it works great. Yes, some of them got hacked and lost millions of users' money. But this business model is a highly lucrative one. The business just needs to remember to enhance security as the business scales. Case-in-point: Binance is a cryptocurrency exchange started July 2017. Today, just after one year of operations, it has about 6 million users and recorded $200 million in profits (Source: https://www.ccn.com/binance-surpassed-germanys-biggest-bank-deutsche-in-profitability/), far surpassing Deutsche Bank, a 200-year-old bank with 100,000 employees, in terms of profitability. Cryptocurrencies are losing its value now because the market is going through a retrace from the incredible bull run in Dec 2017 - Jan 2018. This is not the first time, price of Bitcoin has retraced several times after hitting highs in 2011 and 2013. Besides, prices of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other major cryptocurrencies are still higher compared to the prices exactly this time last year. For example, in Aug 2017, Bitcoin is valued at about $4,000. Today it is valued at about $6,500. Don't count cryptocurrencies out yet - maybe it's not stable enough to count as a safe investment right now, but it's important to be open-minded and focus on the technology and why it exists today. Some reasons why the concept of Bitcoin is novel: 1. Bitcoin allows the peer-to-peer exchange of value without an intermediary. All other exchange of value requires a bank/financial institution/company that can be attacked or can experience downtime. 2. Bitcoin is starting to be considered as a safe haven asset. Because it has no correlations with any other assets or commodities markets, it can be used as a good hedge. Most of the activities in the crypto space is white noise, yes. But cryptocurrencies in itself is an interesting concept. I encourage you to be open minded. Don't put all your eggs in one basket and maybe cryptocurrencies might be a way to hedge your risks in other financial instruments.

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Don't confuse robo adviser with algo trader. Both are computer programs. Algo trade by the micro-seconds, robos are long term asset allocators.

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Marcus Goh
    25 Answers, 37 Upvotes

    I believe you are looking at Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) which is more of a dividend investing. You should know the fundamentals and the things to look out for in REITs to maximum your returns like the Gearing Ratio and Distribution Per Unit (DPU) and ultimately do your due digilence. Fifthperson has compiled SG REITs data with Live Daily Updates (According to their website) and you could look more about it and make your choices according after doing your homework. https://sreit.fifthperson.com/

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