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StashAway

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About StashAway

StashAway started in the year 2016 by ex ZALORA Group CEO, Michele Ferrario and ex Nomura MD, Freddy Lim.

It is Singapore’s intelligent, automated digital wealth manager that personalises, rebalances, and optimises your portfolio so you can reach your goals.

Method of investing for StashAway

StashAway adopts an Economic Regime-based Asset Allocation™ method.

It is an investment strategy that harnesses economic trends to maximise your returns at the risk level that feels right to you.

Minimum investment and fees for StashAway

StashAway has no minimum balance required. This means that any amount of investment is welcomed.

StashAway charges a management fee ranging from 0.2% to 0.8%.

Don't forget to leave your feedback on Stashaway here!

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Investments

Robo-Advisors

Promo Codes

StashAway

If you use my referral link below, you can get up to $10,000 managed for free for 6 months. At least for first 6 months you can try out with a smaller amount without management fees!!!!!!! www.stashaway.sg/referrals/siownanw3zpr

Robo-Advisors

Investments

SeedlyTV EP04

MoneyOwl

StashAway

AutoWealth

Dennis Hoe
Dennis Hoe, Advisory Team Lead at Moneyowl
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 06 Jun 2019
Hi, I’m Dennis Hoe, Advisory Team Lead at MoneyOwl. Thank you for your question. As the other respondents have highlighted below, there is a correlation between return and risk. Risk is often proxied by volatility, though in a sense it is only one aspect of risk. The difference between a low-risk and high-risk portfolio typically lies in the asset allocation between equities and bonds, as equities have higher volatility than bonds. A low-risk portfolio generally has higher allocation into fixed income/bonds. If the bonds are of investment-grade, the returns are generally stable and is less volatile. However, the long-term returns are lower, as compared to investing into equities. A high-risk portfolio typically has more allocation in equities. Historically, equities have always been the driver for returns as stock market goes up in the long term due to growth in global demand. In a study of the US market between July 1926 to December 2017 done by Dimensional Fund Advisors, we see that in any 10-year period, out of 991 overlapping periods, equities beat Treasury bills (short-dated government bonds generally regarded as risk-free) 85% of the time. A well-diversified portfolio of equities is better positioned to gain higher return in the long term but it is more volatile (higher fluctuations). That said, while we all know that equities go up in the long term, it is important to be invested in a portfolio that suits your risk appetite in which you can stay invested comfortably throughout the fluctuations during your investment period. Because the worst thing that you can do is get out too early when the market plunges as a result of not being able to handle the volatility emotionally and miss out on capturing market returns. If so, it might be better for you to have some bonds in your portfolio to dampen volatility but stay invested to reap the long-term return of that asset allocation. To determine which type of portfolio is suitable for you, our advice is structured around these 3 factors: 1) Need to take risk – What are you investing for? Are your current resources enough to meet the goal? The higher your goal relative to your resources, the higher the need for return. 2) Ability to take risk – Your financial situation. Do you already have your emergency funds in place? How long of an investment period do you have to reach your goal? The longer the investment period, the more capacity. For a pure equity portfolio, MoneyOwl recommends 15 years to have a high degree of certainty of having no negative annualised returns, based on historical observations over the long term. If “tail events” are excluded, this 15-year time frame reduces to about 10 years. However, the caveat always is that historical returns are not a guarantee of future returns. 3) Willingness to take risk – What is your likely reaction to the fluctuation of your investment return? Will you sell off your investment when the value drops in event of market downturn? This is your tolerance for short-term losses and fluctuations. At MoneyOwl, we believe that successful investing is not about maximising returns. Rather, we emphasise sufficiency of returns and the reliability of those returns. As mentioned, volatility is only one perspective of risk. From a financial planning standpoint, not being able to meet the return you need to live the life you want, or having your purchasing power eroded by inflation, are also risks. Thus, successful investing for individuals is really about getting the highest probability of getting sufficient returns, with as little guesswork and as little as stress possible, that will meet your goals such as financial independence. Having the right asset allocation for market-based returns, keeping costs low and very importantly, staying invested for the long term are the keys to a successful investing experience. Hope this helps – and if you would like to speak with someone, please feel free to contact us at [email protected](mailto:[email protected]). As we are a Bionic Financial Adviser rather than a pure robo, my team of client advisers will be most happy to have a discussion with you about your risk profile.

General

StashAway

Soon Xiaohui
Soon Xiaohui
Level 6. Master
Answered on 27 Jun 2018
It is always good to start with the small amount first when you are new to investment. This is to allow you to understand the platform (you are using) and building your investment psychology (understand how the markets may perform) But always make sure you have emergency fund ready before you increase your investment amount after you graducated

Investments

Robo-Advisors

Regular Shares Savings Plans (RSS)

StashAway

Yes, investing regularly will be profitable in the long run, nothing to do with whatever robo-advisors or manual investing, so congrats on whatever you choose. You will be profitable in the long run because 1. dollar cost averaging in the long run 2. funds give u diversification and exposure to a wide range of stocks 3. ETF gives u investments at a low cost Robo advisors help in removing emotions to stress on the dollar cost averaging. =) There are many other ways why robo-advisors help, meh. I think the dollar costs averaging will be the most useful part. :D

Investments

Regular Shares Savings Plans (RSS)

StashAway

You should consider and evaluate balanced and differentiated portfolios like All Weather or Asia REITs Kristals at Kristal.AI First 50K Investment is at Zero Fee Learn more from us here: http://bit.ly/36ci0yF Do let us know your feedback - would love to improve over time.

Investments

Regular Shares Savings Plans (RSS)

Robo-Advisors

MoneyOwl

SeedlyTV EP04

STI ETF

ETF

StashAway

Brian
Brian
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered 1d ago
Hi E-An Tan, I think that for low monthly contributions, you might want to consider the various fees that each robo-advisor platform charges. From their websites, Stashaway only charges for Management Fee (0.8% for your amount), 0.1% of spot rate for currency exchanges, and ~0.2% ETF fee; MoneyOwl charges 0.65% advisory fee, 0.18% advisory fee, and 0.3-0.4% fund management expense. For MoneyOwl, only the advisory fee is taken by MoneyOwl. Thus considering the type of investments that you are making, the relevant fees will be charged. I think both platforms will allow your monthly investment amount nonetheless. You might also want to consider the objectives of investing as an NSF. Personally, I feel that while you are still young and have a considerable amount of time on your side (with the internet access of course), you might want to start "experential learning" by exploring what investing in different asset classses are like. You can start so by understanding the portfolio allocation that each robo-advisor platform recommends to you and look at the breakdown of asssets they invest in. If you want a mmore flexible approach in investing, you can consider Kristal.AI where there are 0% management fees for investors with under $50k accounts. After looking at their recommended portfolio, I would suggest looking at the other ETFs (known as "Kristals") and analysing the ETF's breakdown of asset allocation via the factsheets. The plus point would be customisability of the exposure that you want in your complete portfolio! Hope this helps! :) https://advice.moneyowl.com.sg/on-moneyowls-fees-and-comparisons/ https://www.stashaway.sg/pricing https://kristal.ai/help-center/ https://solutions.kristal.ai/seedlypost

Investments

DBS

StashAway

Hi Anon, my view is that it would be better to have part of your rainy-day funds in more liquid assets like cash, as it takes up to one month to liquidate an SSB. In an emergency, you would want to have immediate liquidity. Although I do not know what REITS you have bought, but having $800 across 5 REITs would have incurred quite a significant brokerage cost for you, even if you are just dipping your fingers. You will need to account for the cost of investment when you invest as it can significantly eat into your returns, especially when your capital outlay is low. Usually, for shares, I would not advise purchasing them unless you have significant capital to deploy (we're talking mid-4 figures and above) If you have $1.2K/month to invest, I would recommend dividing your cashflow into various buckets to go into the various asset classes. You can allocate some to UTs, some to ETFs such as Stashaway, some to a warchest to prepare to buy shares when opportunities present themselves, and some to an annuity to hedge your investment risk. The allocation will depend on various factors such as your preferences and risk appetite. You may want to consider talking to an independent advisor who will be able to provide you with greater insight and help you craft a strategy to implement that will suit you. I am only able to advise you based on the information you have currently provided; any further advice would require a deeper understanding of your situation. Feel free to reach out to me if you require.

Savings

Investments

StashAway

Syfe

Agree with Kelly, unless there's a need for cash within the next 3 years, you're probably a little too heavy on low yielding instruments. I'd keep 6 months of expenses in a high interest savings account and the rest into a globally diversified portfolio matching my risk profile with a financial advisor (you've chosen Stashaway but you can test out Syfe or any other financial advisor in the market) So if you spend 1k/mth, that'll be 6k in the bank, and the other 55k into such a portfolio. But if there's any money earmarked within 3 years, I'd keep that aside and not expose that to the market.

StashAway

Robo-Advisors

Investments

I suppose you are doing the weighting to compare different potential investment options. You need to do both weightings to ensure a proper 'like with like' comparison. Illustrating using a couple of examples: For money weighting - suppose you had one investments with two parts: $100 with 60% return $400 with 10% return. The return from investing this is is not the simple average of the two returns (ie 35%) as the larger investment has larger impact - the actual return is only 20% (average weighted by investment amount). It is this weighted return that you should use to compare against other investment options. On the time weighting side - Suppose two investment choices giving return: - 1% over 1 month - 16% over two years The equivalent per annum (year) return is 12%/8% - so the former is actually better. (note this assumes that for the first option you could continually reinvest) This type of analysis would be covered in most textbooks on project return evaluation if you are interested in other points that should be considered to ensure proper comparison on which option is best.

Investments

Robo-Advisors

MoneyOwl

StashAway

They both have quite differing approaches to the market. If you can't decide between either, just try both for 3 to 5 years and see the difference.
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