Seedly PFF 2019

Singapore's largest festival for young working adults to learn about personal finance in an unbiased no-sales manner.

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Seedly PFF 2019
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kwok Marlina
    Kwok Marlina
    2 Answers, 6 Upvotes
    Answered 6h ago
    I don’t see the need to limit or restrict myself in Singapore. I found meaning in life through giving, so probably I would involve myself with activities that allows me to give, Be my knowledge, experience or even fund to the less fortunate.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    174 Answers, 291 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    That is a very weird thing to say to someone. For ECI and CI, there does tend to be a cost disparity. If you have Term ECI from the time you're 25 to like 75, for example, there's a pretty good chance you'll have forked out a total sum of money thats higher than a Whole Life plan paid in 15, 20, even 25 years... E.g. Term was $1000/yr WL for 20 years was $2100 Total premium paid by age 75 (Term): $50,000 Total premium paid by age 75 (whole Life): $42,000 This actually happens quite a lot for my clients. The whole life becomes very appealing then, because its not only cheaper overall but has cash values and the sum assured scales with inflation decades after you finish paying for it. But in the short term (1 - 5 years) there's absolutely no whole life plan of the same sum assured, even with multipliers, that can be as cheap as Term. So that's very odd to me. I'm just going to assume you meant long term. Obviously, there are potential issues with forking out more money upfront, especially if you are an avid, aggressive investor, so it's not all sunshine and roses. If you can beat 6% annualized and you're already quite diversified, most people like that can probably just buy a nice ECI Term and invest the rest instead. You have an insurance agent already, but you can always PM me for a second opinion. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Kevin Ong

    Jim Tay
    Jim Tay, Director at Jimtay.com
    10 Answers, 11 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    Putting it in the simplest terms, the cost of using your CPF funds is 2.5% per annum. (compounded, and ignoring the additional 1% on the first $20k) So, if you can make more than 2.5% compounded returns on your cash, then use your CPF for mortgage. Otherwise, use your cash.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Leonard Tan
    Leonard Tan

    Top Contributor (Feb)

    83 Answers, 118 Upvotes
    Answered 5d ago
    For me it varies. I would set it based on how risky this investment is and volatile this stock has been performing. If I am going long on a stock I believe fundamentally in the long term horizon of 5 years, I probably would not set a stop loss. I would set notifications if the stock falls below 5% and probably look to increase my holdings further. For higher risk investments like options trading or short term plays, I would typically set a stop loss of about 6-8%.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Junus Eu
    Junus Eu
    34 Answers, 97 Upvotes
    Answered 5d ago
    I started off setting aside at least 50% of my salary from the time I got my first paycheck and it is possible once you determine the kind of lifestyle you need and it's relating budget. It works for me - my aim was to hit six figure savings by 25, and also to buy freehold property by that age. I missed by target for property buying by one year (i was 26 then). Bottom line is - it always helps to have a monthly goal!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Junus Eu
    Junus Eu
    34 Answers, 97 Upvotes
    Answered 5d ago
    The Complete Guide to Capital Markets for Quantitative Professionals by Alex Kuznetsov When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of LTCM by Roger Lowenstein Stochastic Processes by Sheldon Ross
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Sandra Teo
    Sandra Teo

    Top Contributor (Feb)

    102 Answers, 156 Upvotes
    Answered 3w ago
    Morgan Stanley analysts expect emerging markets to outperform in 2019 with a base case forecast of 8% price return for MSCI EM index. Based on the earning growth prospects for the MSCI EM index, it compares favorably with the S&P500 index, standing at 10+% and 6+% respectively. However, historical data has shown that over the last 6 years the Y-O-Y earnings growth is 0. This goes to show that investing in EM is a long term strategy for investors with a high risk tolerance to be able to ride out the high volatility of the em equities market. Year-Over-Year Earning Per Share Growth for MSCI Emerging Markets Index, Bloomberg Data
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Lou
    Kenneth Lou, Co-founder at Seedly
    346 Answers, 821 Upvotes
    Answered 6d ago
    Hey Friend! Thank you so much for your keen interest in our event :) We are working hard behnid the scenes to plan ahead for bigger and better events. There are two types of major events we do: - Meetups (these happen between monthly to bi-monthly). We'll update you via email and via our social networks - Large scale events (For example, the Seedly PFF2019 usually around March period) and there could be another one later in the year) Still in the works! See you at some of our events! Cheers :) If you have any questions please let us know below in the comments section or contact us at [email protected] Kenneth
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Richard Woon Tian Jun
    Richard Woon Tian Jun

    Top Contributor (Feb)

    93 Answers, 148 Upvotes
    Answered 6d ago
    Well I think timing the market is truly a difficult thing to do. If we could all time the market well, we would be millionaires, and there wouldn't be a need for Financial Analysts and brokers any longer! I think the best thing to do is to evaluate the company's value - is the company's current stock price in the market lower or higher than your calculated intrinsic value? if it's lower, then no matter what the price will eventually go to this intrinsic value according to your calculation - it's a buy! if it's the other way round, then you could possibly short the stock as you anticipate an eventual fall in price as investors start to not see the value in the stock and sell off. If not, perhaps Dollar cost averaging can help you as it removes the need to time the market completely - your good buys balance our your bad buys, so eventually the price averages out. That being said, there is no need to be eager to jump right in! evaluate what you want to buy, read the news, get enough supporting evidence to show that the firm will do as well as you believe it will, before you invest. You can really see a much better chance of profits in this way!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hao Yu
    Hao Yu, Advisory Specialist at MoneyOwl
    6 Answers, 10 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    All the answers provided are key reasons that contribute to the lower performance of Index ETF to the Index it’s tracking. Another reason is because the measurement of performance of Index ETF and Index is by time-weighted return. This form of measurement does not take into account the effect of reinvestment of dividends. Thus, when coupled with the effects of fees etc, Index etf underperform. However, in reality, you maybe performing better than Index because you are holding more units of the Index etf and this compounds your returns over time. For example: (exclude fee) index started at $1 Index returns 10% + 2% dividend index ends at $1.10 Index ETF started at $1 - you invest $100, 100 units Index ETF returns 10% + 2% dividend index etf price $1.10 your holdings = $112.20 $1.10 at 102.2 units. You will notice that both Index and Index etf will have annual return of 10% which is the figure that they will report. However notice that as an individual, you’re better off with the extra 2.2 units and your return is actually 12.2%. This is just a simple illustration and in reality it is not so clear cut with all the fees involved. Therefore, when investing always track your own investment using money weighted return (XIRR) and not rely on the fundhouses return.
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