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Retirement

Making sure you have enough for the later years

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Retirement

CPF

Dividends

Investments

L
LWJ
Level 6. Master
Answered 43m ago
When u say saved enough means you do not need to rely on CPF money for retirement. If I were you, I would like to debt free when I retire. If I can afford, I will pay it off with cash as the CPF money providing guaranteed return. For investment, I always prefer to use cash rather using CPF OA.

Investments

Retirement

Dividends

Stocks Discussion

L
LWJ
Level 6. Master
Answered 1h ago
The best time to enter market is yesterday, next best time is today. Yr concern is valid. U can consider dca method if u r worry market melt down the next moment after u purchase. Many ppl fail dca because of discipline and panic when market goes down.

Property

Retirement

Resale HDB

L
LWJ
Level 6. Master
Answered 2h ago
If the old flat remaining lease can't cover u until 95 years old, the cpf usage will be pro rated. So next time when u want to sell, the buyer will face similar problem and it may affect the resale value. If u intend to keep for the rest of yr life, then no big issue. Otherwise u may want to avoid those flat that alr more than 40 years old.

Insurance

Payments

Retirement

Investments

Savings

Lifestyle

L
LWJ
Level 6. Master
Answered 12h ago
It looks like u r paying more than 10% of yr salary to insurance and that haven't include yr endowment plan. Rule of thumb is not more than 10%. U might want to talk to some good FA to restructure yr coverage.

CPF

Retirement

CPF SA

Investments

REITs

Blue Chips

Stocks Discussion

JL
Joe Lee, Adventurer at Game of Life
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered 17h ago
You should look into your future plans to see if you have any liquidity issues as well. On top of cash - SA, you can also look into your future OA - SA. Personally i feel that having CPF life annuity should be the backbone of your retirement plan but it SHOULD NOT be your only source of income for retirement. I will suggest reaching your FRS first before looking at stocks/reits.

Investments

Retirement

CPF

Lok Yang Teng
Lok Yang Teng
Level 8. Wizard
Answered 18h ago
T-bills work in a little different way from SSB. Currently, you're profitting through receving coupons (interests) semi-annually from your investment. For T-bills, you bid and purchase the T-bill at a discount. For example, you can bid $990 for a $1000 bill. The difference between the bid and face('actual') value is your profit. The denominations are in $1000, a little more strict than SSB. Personally, I find the yield too low (1.59% in 2020) and might even lose out to inflation. Being just in your mid-20s, you have a long investment horizon and you definitely should look at other forms of invesments. If you are looking at a safe place to park your emergency funds in contrast, SC JumpStart offers 2.0%, POSB/DBS Save As You Earn up to 2.25% (though a little like fixed deposit) are definitely better options. Depending on your spending habits, you can hit 3% or more from high interest savings account.

Investments

Savings

Stocks Discussion

Retirement

Syfe

REITs

CH
CH
Level 6. Master
Updated 2d ago
Snapshot of my syfe reit portfolio as of today: ! specific to this reit+ portfolio: pros: spread out over sectors and geography big names reits, good management SGD denominated. no forex risk. cons: did not specify whether the 15 reits are fixed or it can be added or reduced as and when required. dont like the inclusion of bond fund inside whether is it worth it, depends on your desired returns and also whether do you have time to study individual stock or index. https://www.businessinsider.sg/syfe-launches-reit-portfolio-to-give-investors-easy-affordable-access-to-sgx-listed-reits/ the above article reported that backtesting shows 5 years generated 9% yield, whereas S&P500 returns was ~12%. if you know how to pick stocks or index, picking individual reits may outperform syfe reit index. but as with robos and robos portfolio, the idea is in the low starting capital, the flexibility (no lock up period), low fees and auto rebalancing. i see reits generally as "safer" investments due to the regular dividend payouts. don't think it will continue to run like the past 1-2 years. personally, the run up was probably due to interest rates cuts. so, if in future central banks increase rates reits interest expenses may increase. hope this helps.
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Investments

Insurance

Retirement

Justin Tan
Justin Tan
Level 2. Rookie
Updated 1d ago
Dear Terrence, Thank you for asking. Currently, MoneyOwl is the only financial advisory firm that provides a online comprehensive financial planning service. This is the 4th service that MoneyOwl offers. (The earlier being insurance advisory, will-writing and investments.) The comprehensive financial planning brings all these together and more: clients get a financial health check; an analysis of protection needs; children's education and retirement or financial independence goals and a detailed analysis of their CPF. A centrepiece of the comprehensive planning service is the MoneyOwl CPF analyser that projects client's CPF balances into future years considering inflows, outflows and multiple CPF rules and limits. The full fee is $500 but MoneyOwl is currently waiving this fee. So please do give it a try!

Savings

Investments

Career

CPF

Retirement

Cecilia Leong
Cecilia Leong
Level 2. Rookie
Updated on 07 Jun 2019
Buy my first home after my divorce to give stability to my 3 kids

Retirement

Investments

Stocks Discussion

Bonds

ETF

Endowus

Hi! It is possible thatall 3 options can work, some people would argue that bond exposures need to be managed. You might have heard that German/Japanese bonds are negatively yielding (or negative Yield-to-Maturity (YTM)) from the news, and that negative yeidl is reflected into the bond ETF pricing and projected YTM. You can check out the negative german government bond etf here, look for the negative YTM: https://www.ishares.com/uk/individual/en/literature/fact-sheet/sdeu-ishares-germany-govt-bond-ucits-etf-fund-fact-sheet-en-gb.pdf If someone were to sell a bond ETF or fund with a negative YTM, or a very low YTM, rather than just looking at it from a "exposure" angle, I would think it is fair decision to make. The reason why we are not just holding cash instead of bonds to diversify is because of the higher returns bond give. The ABF Bond ETF and NIkko bond ETF has a YTM of 1.90% and 2.57%, which is decent for the credit rating, but do keep an eye on its YTM, especially if its ETF share price increases.
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