PFF Panel 3

Panel is moderated by Yeap Ming Feng from Seedly

ASK A QUESTION
PFF Panel 3

Welcome to Seedly’s inaugural Personal Finance Festival 2019!

In this third panel, we will be discussing some hacks and useful tips to successful investing. Come hear our panel speakers as they share some tips and tricks with you!

  • Joel Sim (founder of Mr Finance Savvy and has over 10 years of trading experience)
  • Alvin Chow (CEO of DrWealth who developed the Factor Based Investing CNAV strategy)
  • Victor Chng (is an equity investor and co-founder of The Fifth Person)

This panel is moderated by Ming Feng from Seedly.

  • Asked by Jovin

    Anu Singh
    Anu Singh
    Level 1. Freshie
    Answered 2w ago
    Of course, it is a yes. Investing in cryptocurrency can be tricky, meaning that the market is highly volatile and there can be a huge risk. On the other hand, it can prove to be very profitable also. Here I am mentioning some pros and cons of cryptocurrency: https://www.pcex.io/blog/is-crypto-a-good-investment/
  • Asked by Jovin

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    Level 6. Master
    Answered 3w ago
    They did answer that it was against the STI. I benchmark against a particular absolute return of 8% annualized net of fees, though. You should aim higher if you're young. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Jovin

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    Level 6. Master
    Answered 3w ago
    The market is already quite efficient without robos. In fact, robos aren't as efficient as people think. Stashaway is trying to beat the market to some degree, for example. I don't really think the skills you learn will have anything to do with their ETF strategies.
  • Asked by Leonard Tan

    Junus Eu
    Junus Eu
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Mar)

    Level 6. Master
    Answered 4w ago
    I gotta agree with Jonathana - Subway is not my idea of fresh/healthy food as well. I always wonder about the 'Eat Fresh' slogan when I see the tomato slices lying there for hours. I think that while there is a part of the world that values healthy eating, there is still the mainstream that is looking for taste over health. In Singapore alone, just look at the snaking queues for bubble tea. When I was in L.A., I definitely felt that the folks there are more health conscious, but also because it was trendy to eat avocado toasts and acai bowls. On to McDonalds itself. 85% of the company in 2016 was represented by franchisee-run locations. Here's the thing: McDonald’s makes much of its revenue by buying the physical properties and then leasing them to franchisees, often at large mark-ups, instead of collecting a lot in royalties or selling its franchisees cooking equipment. Additionally, we know that McDonalds had recently announced in end March 2019 that they will acquire Israeli startup Dynamic Yield, a technology company focused on personalization and decision logic, for $300 million. The aim is to create a more personalized experience that will include new outdoor digital drive-thru menu displays that can change depending on the time, weather, current restaurant traffic and trending menu items. Additionally, the tech will also be applied to digital customer experience touch points, including self-order kiosks and its Global Mobile App. All this is to look at increasing 1. average customer spend and 2. order volume. You can see where they are headed with this. On a side note, I realize the last McDonald's meal I had cost me $10! It just baffles me how much one can spend on fast food, which is supposed to be cheap.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Billy Ko
    Billy Ko, President - Investment Club at Singapore Institute Of Technology
    Level 5. Genius
    Answered 4w ago
    I indeed am one of the investors caught in the whole Hyflux incident. A mistake on my part was not doing my due dilligence when they issued a second round of 6% Perpetual Securities. It was debt building on debt yet I still went to apply for it. I had the mindset that Hyflux had never once forfeited its payments since the first day of its Cumulative Preference Share. But alas, if I had done my homework, I would've noticed its negative cash-flow partially due to its overly rapid expansion leading to its unsustainable business model adding on it's already high OPEX. Somtimes I guess lessons have to be learnt the hard way. Swiber, Noble, Hyflux, Rickmers, its good to read up on their downfall so one wouldn't be in the footsteps of these investors
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Sandra Teo
    Sandra Teo
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Mar)

    Level 6. Master
    Updated on 02 Mar 2019
    Hi there! I started by investing in a traditional high yield savings account, to take advantage of compounding! I personally use both the DBS Multiplier account and POSB SAYE Account. To maximize the interest rates (2.0% p .a.), I deposit a fixed amount every month from the DBS multiplier account to the POSB saye account. I like having a separate savings account because it prevents me from touching the money and let the effect of compounding be maximized!
  • Asked by Zareth Lim

    Jonathan Chia Guangrong
    Jonathan Chia Guangrong, Fund Manager at JCG Fund
    Level 6. Master
    Answered on 21 Mar 2019
    Just to add on to what the others have shared. Mutual funds usually reside on a platform where there are fees involved on top of the fund's management fees. Dividends, if any are taken off the NAV. And there may also be a sales charge when buying funds, usually 3 or 5%. Some etfs can be traded 24/5, so you are not limited to just market hours. Depending on the platform used, there may be platform fees incurred as well for etfs. But this is usually minimal as compared to the ones for mutual funds. There are management fees for etfs as well but this is usually very minimal, less than 1% or even as low as 0.04%.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Richard Woon Tian Jun
    Richard Woon Tian Jun
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Mar)

    Level 6. Master
    Answered on 11 Mar 2019
    Well I think timing the market is truly a difficult thing to do. If we could all time the market well, we would be millionaires, and there wouldn't be a need for Financial Analysts and brokers any longer! I think the best thing to do is to evaluate the company's value - is the company's current stock price in the market lower or higher than your calculated intrinsic value? if it's lower, then no matter what the price will eventually go to this intrinsic value according to your calculation - it's a buy! if it's the other way round, then you could possibly short the stock as you anticipate an eventual fall in price as investors start to not see the value in the stock and sell off. If not, perhaps Dollar cost averaging can help you as it removes the need to time the market completely - your good buys balance our your bad buys, so eventually the price averages out. That being said, there is no need to be eager to jump right in! evaluate what you want to buy, read the news, get enough supporting evidence to show that the firm will do as well as you believe it will, before you invest. You can really see a much better chance of profits in this way!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    ぃ杰
    ぃ杰
    Level 2. Rookie
    Answered on 03 Mar 2019
    Nicholes Wong: But if the dividends are 4% every year, where does the 4% go? Wouldn't that be a huge loss compared to buying the stock itself (esp when compounded over many years)?
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