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PFF Panel 2

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Investments

PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

For an intermediate investor, how would you recommend me to better my investment returns? What is an acceptable return % to you?
Frankie Rappaport
Frankie Rappaport
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Jun)

Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered 6d ago
4-5% will be acceptable and realistic for the total portfolio. 40% or more per year how could that be realistic?
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PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

Investments

Could anyone tell me how much research is enough for me to start investing? Is there a way to measure?
Lim Boon Tat
Lim Boon Tat, Mathematics at Cambridge University
Level 6. Master
Answered on 03 May 2020
Depends on your circle of competence and how deep you are into it. For example, if you work in tech, participate in tech meetups/conferences regularly, rub shoulders with tech people all the time, you probably have some special insights into tech, and you may find it a lot easier to predict the success of tech companies much better than most. Of course, you should still do some basic research into the financials and management of the companies. There are 4 key principles that you should focus on: (1) Buy into companies that you can understand (2) Companies have honest and able management (3) Companies have a competitive advantage that's likely to last for the next 10 years (4) Calculate a sensible and attractive price (which is dependent on your desired ROI for the next 10 years). Point (4) requires some explanation: For example, if you are only looking looking at 10% returns per year and let's say you are buying the stock at $100 today, the stock price will need to reach $259.37 in ten years. Based on (1), (2) and (3), you should be able to work out some reasonable estimate for the stockprice/intrinsic value of the stock. PM me if you need more clarity.
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PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

I've been living paycheck to paycheck since starting work 10 years ago. I'm now 35 with hardly any savings. I hope it's not too late for me. Where do I start and what can I do to catch up?
Tai Zhi
Tai Zhi, Chief Investment Officer at Autowealth
Level 6. Master
Updated on 05 Mar 2019
Btw, starting at age 35 is imho not too late. So don't be discouraged. (1) Be discipline towards savings and investing Particularly in this case where you have limited financial resources, you should be even more disciplined. Sometimes it requires you to make tough decisions, delaying luxury purchases and purchase only when its an essential need. (2) Start low risk, build confidence before gradually increasing portfolio risk Investors who just got started should go low risk first. Be patient. Go through a market correction to feel the market fluctuations and better understand your emotional resilience towards market volatility (ie fluctuations). When you gain more confidence and experience, gradually increase your portfolio risk to accelerate your wealth accumulation. (3) Invest broadly to diversify away risk Do not be too narrowly focused, diversify broadly so that specific market developments like U.S.-China trade tensions will not cause a catastrophic loss. Therefore, try to start off with a globally-diversified portfolio of stocks and bonds with a higher allocation to bonds. For example, you may consider starting with the AutoWealth Conservative Portfolio (60% global government bonds 40% global stocks) before switching to a portfolio with higher risk. Check out our blog posts for other useful investment insights and concepts: https://www.autowealth.sg/blog/
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PFF Panel 2

Investments

Seedly PFF 2019

How can I invest $30k and grow it in 10 years time?
Frankie Rappaport
Frankie Rappaport
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Jun)

Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered on 05 Mar 2020
With such a long time horizon stock investing could be very successful compared to other asset classes. passive indexing ETFs would be the choice, mutual funds should be avoided (higher fees for on average lower returns, mostly obsolete nowadays) more on my private thinking here: https://seedly.sg/questions/what-is-your-general-investing-philosophy-strategy
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PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

I’m 26 this year and just started working, should I start with a ETF as my first investment?
Arpita Mukherjee
Arpita Mukherjee, Community Evangelist at Kristal.AI
Level 6. Master
Answered on 13 Nov 2019
Hi Anon, The first step of your investment journey would be to read up and understand what investing is. Although there are so many financial advisors out ther who can help you with this, I'd suggest that you go for a robo-advisory platform to do the job of assessing your current financial position and recommend a portfolio strategy after reviewing your risk profile. As for the "catch", I would say that Robo-advisors are still not very different from your ordinary financial advisors as both options will still have a management fee incurred for users. The difference lies with the amount, as Robo-advisors have lower management fees. I work at Kristal.AI, and my mojo is to help people make the right financial decisions. If you think I helped you, do give me "Thumbs up". If you think my response was biased let me know, I will work on it.
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PFF Panel 2

Singapore Saving Bonds (SSB)

Investments

Seedly PFF 2019

There is so much buzz about investing in the Singapore Savings Bonds. Is it really worth investing in?
Yen Peng
Yen Peng
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 25 Feb 2020
If you are looking to diversify your portfolio, i think it is good to have - it's relatively safe/guaranteed and low risks. But the current interest rate is simply too low, not worth it. You can get more money if you buy fixed deposits at some banks imo.
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PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

Savings

What's a good ratio of salary vs rent for Singapore? Is it too high to be spending 1/4th of one's monthly pay for rent?
Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered on 03 Dec 2019
Not really, you can do worst with other places such as London & New York, would not be able to save a nickel by the end of the month
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Investments

P2P Lending

PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

For investing in P2P like Funding Societies, and looking at the fact sheet, for a beginner, what are the good indicators for me to decide which company I'm going to invest in?
Brian
Brian
Level 4. Prodigy
Updated on 15 Nov 2019
In my opinion for starters, I would consider the following non-exhaustive list of factors: 1. Debt-to-Equity Ratio This tells you how much Debt the company is holding relative to equity and a higher gearing ratio would mean that the company is taking on a larger proportion of debt to run its company. 2. Cash Conversion Cycle This takes into account the company's Account Receivables, Account Payables and Inventory Turnover ratio (given by Average AR Colletible Days +Average Inv Cycle -Average Accounts Payable Outstanding). A negative cash conversion cycle means that the company is able to obtain a "interest-free" way of financing its business because it is able to obtain cash before having to pay the company's suppleirs. However, the CCC should be used in comparison to industry peers because some industries generall have negative CCC while others have positive CCC. Negative CCCs are rarer but definitely do occur (i.e. Dairy Farm International) 3. TIE (if available) Times Interested Earned ratio tells investors the ability for the company to pay its debt payments using the income generated (EBIT/Interest Expenses) 4. Macro views Understanding which industry the company sits in would also paint a clearer picture and give you better confidence in the type of business it is running. Overall, ratio should not be used in isolation and taking into account a few indicators at once can tell you a better story of the loan.
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PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

CPF

If I got 1million at 65 years old in my cpf, how much can I withdraw monthly?
You can consider using this from CPF Board to calculate: https://www.cpf.gov.sg/eSvc/Web/Schemes/LifeEstimator/LifeEstimator
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PFF Panel 2

Seedly PFF 2019

How did you find your financial planner and what factors made you decide that you would be their client?
Luke Ho
Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
Level 7. Grand Master
Answered on 09 Apr 2019
Someone who can answer the conflict of interest well would make a good financial planner. I'm not perfect at it, but its what I'm striving for. Some have even higher aspirations, like being an Independent Financial Advisor (via MAS definition, not working for an IFA). What factors does that consist of? Typically it means that when they pitch you something they give you more than one choice. They also can tell you how it benefits you, and how much commission they make if you ask. They can also answer why they are pushing a particular plan if it happens to benefit them more. That's a good start.
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