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Investments

Stocks Discussion

Regular Shares Savings Plans (RSS)

OCBC

Savings

Blue Chips

It’s good that you’re thinking of investing at an early age. But before you start investing, I’d suggest building up your emergency fund, having adequate insurance and minimising any high-interest loans like credit card debts. You can consider RSS plans if you want exposure to Singapore stocks. But if you want a diversified portfolio with exposure to global stocks and bonds, digital wealth managers like Syfe may be another option. (Syfe has no minimum investment amount.) Apart from investing early, diversification is one of the other keys to successful investing. Simply put, don’t invest all your money in the same place e.g. in one specific stock. A diversified portfolio helps reduce your investment risk so that you won’t lose everything if the market underperforms. To diversify your portfolio, you would want to invest in different types of assets such as stocks and bonds. Next, diversify your investments within these asset classes. With stocks, this could mean investing in a mix of large cap, mid cap, and small cap stocks for instance. This is also the reason I generally advise against picking individual stocks. Instead, I recommend investing in Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) for quick, easy diversification since ETFs allow you to invest in a large number of stocks through a single transaction.

Credit Card

OCBC

Citibank

Shopping

Lifestyle

Miles

CY
Clare Yeo

()

Level 2. Rookie
Answered 2w ago
As far as I know, OCBC N90 card does not charge conversion fee when you convert your points to mileage but Citi does. The downside for OCBC is you can only convert to Krisflyer miles while Citi has a lot more airline partners. However, if you only intend to convert to Krisflyer miles, then the OCBC card makes more sense since there is no conversion fee.

Bank Account

Savings

UOB

OCBC

Eric Loh
Eric Loh

()

Level 2. Rookie
Answered 3w ago
OCBC definitely. Easy to navigate with clear, minimal icons. However, functions may not be as many as POSB/DBS.

Credit Card

Lifestyle

OCBC

Citibank

DBS

UOB

Kenneth Lou
Kenneth Lou, Co-founder at Seedly

()

Level 8. Wizard
Answered 3w ago
I would say YouTrip can be a good option for you to consider? If you are spending for a few weeks, not months. Because the banks FX rates are really horrendous. Recently I went to China and used my OCBC card to transact. What happened was that the exchange rate was $20 more than if I would have used YouTrip #TrueStory. So staying there a few months, you can either use YouTrip or choose to use a local card to transact in local HKD currency instead rather than in SGD (because you would be eaten up by the bank FX rates for sure!)

Credit Card

OCBC

Miles

Shopping

Lifestyle

Aik Kai
Aik Kai
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Aug)

Level 5. Genius
Answered 3w ago
Yes, it is worth it in my opinion. Let's put it into cents to make it simpler. You are willing to pay 1.8 cents to buy a mile. The 90°N allows you to buy a mile at 0.75 cents. In this case, it is less than your limit so, why not? You can refer to the articles below for reference: 1) https://milelion.com/2019/08/28/2019-edition-best-cards-for-overseas-spending/ 2) https://mainlymiles.com/2019/08/26/credit-card-review-ocbc-90n-mastercard/ (go straight to the comments. much better explanation)

OCBC

Miles

Credit Card

It's pretty decent for overseas spend, at least till the end of the promotion period. After which, I would revert to BOC Elite Miles card if I am able to generate sufficient spending to redeem my miles regularly. If not, you can consider holding on if you would prefer to earn miles that do not expire. For local spending, on par with other entry levels $30K cards (CitiPM, DBS Altitude), but no lounge access. On the other hand, 1000 miles transfer blocks and no transfer fee will make this a good card to top up your miles balance in small increments.

Investments

Regular Shares Savings Plans (RSS)

Stashaway

OCBC

Harvey Tan
Harvey Tan

()

Level 5. Genius
Updated on 16 Aug 2019
If you want local exposure, STI ETF is the way to go. But note that STI ETF comprise of the 30 largest listed companies in Singapore by market capitalisation. Top 3 holdings are DBS, UOB and OCBC. This ETF is heavily weighted in financials.

Bank Account

DBS Altitude Visa Signature Card

DBS

DBS Multiplier

OCBC 360

OCBC

Credit Card

Savings

Family

Expenses

XY
Xue Yi Hang

()

Level 2. Rookie
Answered on 13 Aug 2019
It won't affect your credit score. Personally I keep multiple bank accounts as it 1. Makes it easy to segregate my money so I only touch what is in my spending account 2. DBS ATMs often have long queues so I just draw money at OCBC ATMs which usually have nobody and then ibank money between my own accounts lol

Robo-Advisors

OCBC

Harvey Tan
Harvey Tan

()

Level 5. Genius
Updated on 04 Aug 2019
In short, no from a cost perspective. OCBC Roboinvest has a base fee of 0.88% and the cost of investing in the underlying securities/portfolio would most likely cost another 0.5% - 1%. Total cost of investing with OCBC RoboInvest is at minimum approx. 1.25% and above. It is expensive but if you want a hassle free approach to the tech exposure, OCBC Robo is passable. To me personally, there are better options out there. If you are willing to DIY and if you want exposure to the technoloy sector in the US, try looking at VGT ETF listed on NYSE or IUIT ETF listed on LSE. From a cost persepctive, it is much more efficient. Would recommend Interactive Broker for foreign market. Full disclosure : I have not tried OCBC RoboInvest.
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