Investments

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Investments
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Lok Yang Teng

    Top Contributor (Nov)

    218 Answers, 288 Upvotes
    Answered 7h ago
    Interesting question (I presume you're refering to non precious metal/diamond embedded watches)...I dont invest in watches so I don't have much technical know-hows of watches. But I suppose it's all about demand and supply and more importantly the brand. Although not regarded as the best timepiece makers, Rolex is certainly a household name and probably a reason why its watches increases in value over time.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Lok Yang Teng

    Top Contributor (Nov)

    218 Answers, 288 Upvotes
    Answered 7h ago
    You can buy gold ETF same as other ETF, instead of tracking price of indices here the ETF is tracking price of gold. If you prefer physical gold (necklace, ring, bullion), you can buy those from pawn shops.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Nov)

    229 Answers, 393 Upvotes
    Answered 16h ago
    Commodities would be king in wartime. Buy Gold and hold till it's safe to go out again.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Nov)

    229 Answers, 393 Upvotes
    Answered 16h ago
    Skip the STI and SSB and go straight for a global portfolio provided by an FA or a Robo Advisor. You'll have better diversification, constant quaterly rebalancing plus exposure to the world including emerging markets. A moderately aggresive portfolio would do quite fine for your age if you're investing for the long run.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Daniel Ling
    31 Answers, 54 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    You seem to have already rejected him due to your beliefs. Have you given him a chance to explain why his still recommending? If no, consider that. After which you can firmly reject without having to be polite. If you are plain not interested, just be firm. Friend is friend. Work is work. He is advising you as a professional. Rejections are part of being professional.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Elsa Goh
    78 Answers, 151 Upvotes
    Answered on 14 Nov 2018
    Just a suggestion on allocation. You can adjust according to your comfort levels. 1. Keep 30k in a bank account with a good base interest rate and tell yourself not to touch it. With the rising SIBOR i recommend citibank maxigain. These will be your emergency funds. After a while, see if a multiplier account may work better as you develop your spending habits. But the risk of keeping it all in one account is that you will feel more tempted to spend it. 2. Put $10k in singapore savings bonds. Don't look at them for 10 years. No monitoring needed. 3. Remaining $10k use for riskier investments. For this again it really depends on your risk profile. Check out the various seedly articles and always always remember every investment carries some risk. It is whether it is high or low only.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    HC Tang, Financial Enthusiast, Budgeting at The Society
    329 Answers, 793 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    I think it's a good choice. Since you can get 2.2% for DBSM, it's the highest. Rather than keep in SSB and stuck and wait for 10 years, with DBSM, the liqudity not only gives you the right amount of emergency cash liquidity, it also a good way to accumulate war chest and strike go for a shopping sprea during the next downturns. Not to mentioned that DBSM interest paid monthly over the 7th of next month. I would always see as $ in my bank a/c / pocket NOW is better than SSB which is like 6 months later and to realized the full 2.4 / 2.5% I have to get stuck 10 years, that would means I'd miss a lot of good opportunity since a lot of things can happen in the 10 years period. I second your choice! Cheers !
  • Asked by Gabriel Tham

    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Nov)

    229 Answers, 393 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    Comaparison of yield for Male Age 40, 10 year premium term, 20 year payout term for a guaranteed Retirement Income of $500/mth. Aviva MRC: Guaranteed: 2.53%pa Projected: 4.44%pa Total Premiums Paid $61504 NTUC RevoRetire: Guaranteed: 2.07%pa Projected: 4.25%pa Total Premiums Paid $70151 Aviva MRC has more flexible options in premium term and payout term. NTUC has higher death benefit during retirement years. I'd opt for Aviva MRC because bonuses are also paid out during the retirement years unlike NTUC where it pays you a maturity benefit.
  • Asked by Kenneth Lou

    Rach Tay
    1 Answers, 8 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    Friendly & pretty emcee, spontaneous and generous speakers, and a community of helpful and enthusiatic people learning about finance. I like that it was free of charge to public as an introductory thing. Launch more sessions for different topics, different age groups and more on CPF as well, hope To attend more! thanks seedly peeps :)
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Devanshi Singh, Investment Planner, Writer, Adviser at Financial Advisory Services
    6 Answers, 13 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    I don't know what is your reason to think like that. The only thing going that can affect SGX is G20 meeting and the decision between Mr. XI Xing Ping and Mr. Trump. As Singapore is the country based mostly on its trading business, therefore relations between China and The US should be better for the near future. Otherwise, Singapore is not a bad listing place for IPO companies. Its just my opinion as you asked. For more news and SGX market, you can learn from Multi Management Future Solution
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