Expenses Tracking

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Expenses Tracking
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy
    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Apr)

    Level 7. Grand Master
    Answered 2w ago
    Policies with no cash value are expenses. Policies with cash values are assets/investments.
  • Asked by Kenneth Lou

    Khairul Dzakirin
    Khairul Dzakirin
    Level 3. Wonderkid
    Answered 1w ago
    Hi Kenneth, This is an interesting idea. Having ocassional interactions with them, I feel there may be a need. Here are my 2 cents. For a start consider a pilot run just for persons with physical disabilities, largely independent and working (I do see a handful of them commuting to work during rush hours). For individuals with intellectual disability we may consider afterwards. Possible topics: 1) Raising awareness and understanding on available aids: - Transport shuttles or cab cards-not just calling a cab every time, - Medical subsidy eligibility (eg. 100% vs 30% subsidies), - What does means testing means (eg. why are they not eligible for subsidised motorised mobility aid or home modification etc.), - Food delivery service comparison (Tingkat etc.) 2) Finance topic: - Same financial topics eg. Insurance, CPF top up, SSB, same as the rest of us (what do we want to know if we are/become disable and still earning) + car park label scheme or train discount before 7:45am - They may need a bit more emphasis on empowerment. Engagement: - Companies hiring PWD. - Community centres. - Inviting prominent individual to share their financial managment and how they prepare for future complication/ deterioration/ condition progression eg. Jason Chee or Yip Pin Xiu on Seedly TV? - Liaise with association eg: https://www.dpa.org.sg/about-us/our-mission-objectives/ Mode of delivery: - Audio + visual (ppt./video) + subtitles +/- hand sign interpreter for Q&A? - Short braille pamphlets (now thinking about it. side track: cash has braille how about e-payment, ibanking) - If older adults in CC, dialect speakers (hokkien, boyanese etc.). Moving forward: - Talk to social workers who interact with PWD. - Apply bigger grants to conduct sessions (home visits) for families of intellectual disability individual. - Can be part of Seedly’s giving back to the community initiative, in the future. Honestly it may be challenging but it’s worth A try then see how. Hope this helps. BW.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Junus Eu
    Junus Eu
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Apr)

    Level 7. Grand Master
    Answered 5d ago
    Always keep a buffer of 6 months salary. Tackling the individual ones however: 1. Mobile Phone Plans Circles Life is hands-down my favourite telco provider to date. Not just for the price, but they also hold cool hangouts for their Circles Life users! For eg. I recently went Light Saber sparring at The Saber Authority, kindly organized by the Inner Circles team. Amazing outing for a Sunday evening, and perfect for Star Wars fans. Use my referral code JUNUS during your Circles Life signup and get $34 off your registration fee and also UNLIMITED Data free for 3 months. 2. Birthday Celebrations I am assuming that it's the birthdays of people whom you don't really know (because you would already know the birthdays of the people you really care for). If you are being 'coerced' to 'contribute' to someone's birthday present, and feel that it's getting too expensive, be firm about setting a limit. 3. Wedding angpows Unless these are close friends whom I genuinely care for, I usually am not a fan of being asked to a wedding just to fill the table. However, if you really have to go, I am afraid you would just need to pay for it. 4. Last Minute Trips This is what your emergency buffer is for. 5. Ad- Hoc Medical Examinations Likely to be the most costly if it's extensive. See if your insurance covers it - if not, you would also need to tap into your emergency funds.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Junus Eu
    Junus Eu
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Apr)

    Level 7. Grand Master
    Answered 5d ago
    For a foreigner in a non-Singaporean perspective for paying off student loan while saving money in Singapore: 1. Bring monthly Telco prices down Circles Life is hands-down my favourite telco provider to date. Not just for the price, but they also hold cool hangouts for their Circles Life users! For eg. I recently went Light Saber sparring at The Saber Authority, kindly organized by the Inner Circles team. Amazing outing for a Sunday evening, and perfect for Star Wars fans. Use my referral code JUNUS during your Circles Life signup and get $34 off your registration fee and also UNLIMITED Data free for 3 months. 2. Bring food costs down while eating out (especially since you can't eat at home): Tip 1 Embrace Hawkers for cost per meal to be around the range of S$3-5. 3. Bring food costs down: Tip 2 Check out Fave - sometimes with the 1-for-1 deals, its possible to get good meals for $5 per pax. 4. Bring coffee costs down. Instead of fancy coffee like Starbucks etc, make friends with your friendly Malay kopitiam uncle. Amazing coffee and teh halia for under $1.50 5. Bring workout costs down. From monthly membership fees of over $100 for big gyms like Fitness First to more bespoke solutions like Classpass, these options will cost you a few hundred a month for working out. Instead, head out and make use of the exercise parks all over Singapore. Pull-ups are a great work out, and can be done with a pull-up bar outdoors. Other workouts like mountain climbers, burpees and running etc are also options.
  • Asked by Kenneth Lou

    Ng Wei En
    Ng Wei En, Bachelor of Science(Information Systems) at Singapore Management University
    Level 3. Wonderkid
    Answered on 03 Oct 2018
    I am a huge advocate of all forms of cashless payments. Personally use Grabpay, Favepay, Visa/Mastercard through Apple Pay, Singtel Dash, Netspay. My preferred mode of cashless payment is always the one that offers the best cashback or rebate for that particular merchant: For example, -Grabpay offers new promotions every month(e.g Liho, Toast Box,etc) -FavePay offers 5-10% cashback for subsequent purchases with several partnered merchants. -Netspay offers $0.50 off on Wednesdays and Fridays at campus canteens -Apple Pay provides the convenience for me to use my debit cards via a contactless method(used to have promos when Apple Pay just debuted) During the DBS Beep Beep Kaching promotion that lasted about 6 months which unfortunately ended in Sep 2018, I tried to use contactless payment as much as possible to qualify for the minimum $400 in spending via contactless payments. This was done using NetsPay at NETS-only merchants and my DBS Visa Debit Card thru Apple Pay(or Paywave) at merchants that accept credit/debit cards. I was able to earn between $40-$50 cashback per month with a minimum spending of $400 and cashback capped at $50 with spending of $500 per month. This 10% cashback comes with a condition that no cash withdrawals can be made via ATM. During this period, I withdrew cash from an alternative bank account whenever I needed cash. To answer the question, my favourite cashless form of payment is the one that rewards me the most at the time of transaction.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Thaddeus Tan
    Thaddeus Tan, Community Lead at Seedly
    Level 5. Genius
    Answered 4w ago
    Hi there, would appreciate if you could contact [email protected] for your issues. Thank you!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Jervine Chan
    Jervine Chan
    Level 3. Wonderkid
    Answered on 22 Apr 2019
    Why would anyone view you as cheapskate? For a matured woman/man (your date) should be happier when you use coupon or app! If you're a guy then it's a plus point! How many guys out there uses all these nowadays without feeling ashamed or labeled as cheapskate? I have heard stories of my bros saying that their gf are angry and felt ashamed when they use these apps. But walao this kind of person is not a wife/husband material lah. This is Singapore! Every single cent is worth saving! 😆
  • Asked by Tiffany Ler

    Huang Yixuan
    Huang Yixuan
    Level 5. Genius
    Answered on 27 Mar 2019
    Hey there! I’m the product designer of Seedly, currently that feature is not available yet, but it’s one of our upcoming feature for sure!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Lou
    Kenneth Lou, Co-founder at Seedly
    Level 8. Wizard
    Answered on 24 Sep 2018
    There is no right answer to this! But let me try to paint it clearer for the others to understand. 1) 50-50 - Both parties contribute same amount every month I think while this sounds logical, may not be sustainable eg some couples sometimes may have different earning power, but the kids are both their responsibilities. 2) Go by % of income - Both parties contribute same % of their income every month This one seems pretty modern and also the most utalitatian (fair) way to do it. But also need to have common understanding on both sides that by both increasing income, it helps the overall situation. In fact, I think this could work by creating a seperate savings account (eg CIMB Fastsaver at 1% p.a) joint account to withdraw from here. A shared expense - their kids. 3) 100% from Man of the Household I think this way is not the modern way to do it, used to see other families and my mum sharing from some of her colleages that if the wife stays home, that is where she gets a allowance + family maintainence that she will have to budget for groceries and kids etc. 4) Maintain individual savings account I think this may also result in miscommunications which is not so ideal in a long relationship. Money often is the core of most relationship problems. 5) Paying for certain activities (or by respective kid). MY WAY This example is the one my parents used to raise us up. Both are working adults and worked hard to provide for my brother and I. - For tuition, enrichment classes, presents, gifts rewards (for me and my bro) - My Mum covered these - For groceries, petrol, ultilities, and bills - My dad will cover all these So far, we've grown up well, and my family has a strong sense of financial independence and know-how imparting good money values to us as well. So I guess this kinda worked? At the end of the day, find your own way and stick with it!
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