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ETF
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Leonard Tan
    Leonard Tan
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    97 Answers, 151 Upvotes
    Answered 6h ago
    There's quite a few exchanges in China alone. Lets look at Shanghai's stock exchange which is probably the most vibrant exchange in China esp for foreign companies. Some stats to begin with China's Shanghai Stock Exchange is the 4th largest market capitalization in USD. Moreover Shanghai's stock exchange is connected to HKEX through stock connect since 2014, and also linking up with London in 2018. This translates to increased liquidity with larger volume of investors and trading volume. Japan's Exchange Group JPX has the 3rd highest market cap globally. Plus points to note, Japan's currency is known to be one of the most stable in the world. 60% investors base are foreigners. Companies are more than happy when the exchange is subscribed by investors worldwide. Tokyo Stock Exchange has many highly liquid companies. Market Concentration, measured based on the top 10 most traded domestic companies is low compared to Asian peers. This means trading is not concentrated in a few companies(unlike SG). I think the greatest drawing point when many companies list on exchanges is its liquidity and its accessibility to the largest pool of shareholders. Secondly its is the level of regulation by stock exchange- eg. Alibaba wanted to list in HK at first but the duo class share structure but disallowed. Therefore in Asia, HK sits on the perfect balance with access to China's investors but also greater economic stability and less regulation heavy to IPO.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Jonathan Chia Guangrong
    Jonathan Chia Guangrong, Fund Manager at JCG Fund
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    391 Answers, 552 Upvotes
    Answered 13h ago
    For vanguard, you'll need a broker that has access to the US market. Cheap ones will include Td Ameritrade or interactive brokers. For iwda, can try interactive brokers or Stan chart online brokerage. Hope this helps
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Richard Woon Tian Jun
    Richard Woon Tian Jun
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    108 Answers, 177 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    Well, with little cash on hand I assume let's say, $1000. With this $1000 you can actually do quite abit - for example you could go ahead and put a good amount ($300) into shares within the Nikko AM STI ETF, which allows you to tap onto the stable and high dividend paying market. Of course, this willbe a long term investment, so don't go expecting any windfalls in the near future, since I wouldn't say that the Singapore exchange market is particularly "exciting". The payouts in dividends and be used to be redirected and buy more shares within the ETF, but I suggest that you instead accumulate a good amount of money each time to do so - the trading costs of even the lowest online brokerages in SG are about $5? This constant buying of stock will add up, But, giving yourself exposure into an ETF will definitely make you start learning more about the STI 30 companies, and make you more aware of the weakness of the singapore economy eg. too reliant of financial companies - financial industry bad news will lead to a bigger than proportionate fall in the STI as compared to other indexes, for example. you could also place half within SSBs - which enjoy near impervious from defaulting status given that it is backed up by the Singapore Government itself.currently if I'm not wrong SSBs are yielding about 2.4% long term if you hold them to maturity, meaning 10 years. This will allow you get an idea of how bonds work, their payment methods, and the way to go about getting government securities. They cost $500 per bond, which you need to subscribe for by the end of the month, so do look up more info about SSBs! it's a unique instrument to Singapore's non- debt financing government context! Then comes the final about $200 dollars. this $200 dollars is leftover for you to try out the stock market, not just Singapore, but perhaps US as well. I truly think the best way to learn the stock market is not only to read more books, but to literally trade yourself. Use this money to pick a few stocks in invest in - justify your reasons why you want to invest in them (please make sure it makes logical sense why you invest. not just by gut feel or because you heard of them before) and then go ahead and put money into them! And continue to track their progress with the news, you will see a trend where particular news will affect particular stocks differently! Eg. When oil prices fall, Ultility stocks like SP Power mostly will rise in price (given lower cost of producing electricity) and your Electrical Vehicle stocks prices will fall (given that oil is cheaper = normal cars cheaper). this is just a rough example! So I hope this helps you a little, it's just a passing thought of mine, but I really think that no matter what you do, putting real money in as a commitment will really make you learn alot more about the financial industry and about yourself as a investor. Good luck!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Jonathan Chia Guangrong
    Jonathan Chia Guangrong, Fund Manager at JCG Fund
    Top Contributor

    Top Contributor (Feb)

    391 Answers, 552 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    The dividends received in your account from US based stocks are already less 30% due to withholding taxes. There's no need for declaration to iras as far as I know
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Gabriel Tham
    Gabriel Tham
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    544 Answers, 918 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    You can check out the comparisons of RSP https://blog.seedly.sg/which-regular-savings-plan-is-the-cheapest/ Fees are already quite low, I don't think you can get cheaper than that.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Sandra Teo
    Sandra Teo
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    113 Answers, 181 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    The returns you should expect depends on the type of investments the ETF tracks or holds. For instance if you own an ETF that focuses on high-dividend stock, you will probably earn the capital gain and dividends paid out by the stocks the ETF tracks. The ETF should perform roughly in line with their underlying holdings. You can look at an ETF's tracking error which measures the volatility in the difference between the ETF and the underlying index.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Nicholes Wong
    Nicholes Wong, Diploma in Business Management at Nanyang Polytechnic
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    404 Answers, 543 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    VUSD is another one you can consider but its not accumulating etf.
  • Asked by Shabir

    Nicholes Wong
    Nicholes Wong, Diploma in Business Management at Nanyang Polytechnic
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    404 Answers, 543 Upvotes
    Answered 3d ago
    As far as i know, there is none. You have to reinvest the dividends yourself. Singapore ETFs are not that good as well. I think you should take a look at ireland domiciled etf on london stock exchange. They reduce the US withholding tax from 30% to 15%, have more and better ETFs for you to choose and there are ETFs that re-invest dividends which they call Accumulating ETFs if that is what you are interested in.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy
    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent
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    Top Contributor (Feb)

    378 Answers, 632 Upvotes
    Answered 4d ago
    https://www.etf.com/etf-education-center/how-do-bond-etfs-work All you need to know. How Do Bond ETFs Track Their Indexes? Traditional bond indexes make great benchmarks, but terrible portfolios. Most equity ETFs hold every security in their index. But that's usually not possible with bonds. Bond indexes often include hundreds, even thousands, of individual securities. Buying up all those bonds for an ETF's portfolio is not only difficult, but expensive. The cost to purchase thousands of bonds in illiquid markets, even those with minimal impact on the index, can quickly erode returns.
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