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Education

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I think education is pretty afordable if you're a Singaporean. Maybe it might be a little pricey for foreigners. 30-50k for a 3-4 yr undergraduate degree is expected and I think universities in other developed countries would cost the same for their locals as well.

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Do they accept AXS payment? If they do, top up to grab, then use grabpay (as the paying account) through AXS. IF not... find other ways.. like SC cashback card.

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Education

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Career

As someone who paid for investment courses over the years, it boils down to content, ease of use, track record, mentor's attitude, humility, willingness to honour and fix previously issued trades that go wrong. Not to mention the size of the active community. End of the day, the system must work, and continue to work or evolve over time to continue to work. And this must be shared with the community for free. Marketing and speaking at events help. Testimonials from past students, especially those who have reaped success enough from the imparted system to fire their bosses and do it full time helps. My current mentor already has a number of students who fired their bosses.

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One thing that I would like to highlight is to take note on the taxes on property and also the falling AUD. The investment might not look as favorable when these factors are involved.

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There are opportunities in the market at all times. So I will not try to predict the market. For your student loans, 16k is not a huge sum. Being a recent graduate you should be in your early or mid 20s, I suppose? You can consider the amount of loan you want to pay back monthly and still ensuring you have a healthy cashflow. Assuming you have an income of 3k. After CPF it will be 2.4k and say if you wish to have a surplus of 400 a month, you can work backwards to decide the amount you are gng to pay. And then look at how long it will take to clear. If you are good with it, work from there. If not, adjust accordingly. For me, I work on timeline, for example, say I want to clear my loan in 3 years, I just work on the amount I need to pay per month or year to clear it in 3 years. And from there adjust my expenses accordingly around the loan, having some for insurance, savings, investments and daily living.

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Education

Zen Rogue Xuan
Zen Rogue Xuan

()

Level 5. Genius
Updated on 24 Jul 2019
Hi there Anon, good day to you. What you have mentioned are indeed the selling points of each Uni. I think a better way to understand this would be: which one would you be willing to pay the costs ie which downsides are you willing to bear: NTU: compressed timeline, so everything is a rush. NUS: Being "Stuck" in school for too long as compared to your NTU peers SMU: Competitive, no hall. With regards to the paycheck, I would like to tell you that skills and experience matter more than your cert: For the same company, I have first class honours friends who were unable to secure even an interview while my 2nd lower friend were able to get the job, thanks to his internship experience.

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Education

Sure why not ? But for better start instead of waiting to be employ, since you don't really need the $. Try: 1. Go for DM related networking events. 2. Join and find some groups or restaurant or nearby nearboughood cafe and offer your pro bono service to help them do DM and manage their Social Media accounts and increase business. 3. You can show them your qualitifications and passion. If they are skeptical, you can negotiate to try help them out for like 3 to 6 months, and since you're providing pro-bono free services, I don't see why they wouldn't take it up or even work together with you manage it together! If I have a business, I would definite get your help to work this out together! :) Cheers! Jia you !:D

Education

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CPF

Takingstock @
Takingstock @

()

Level 5. Genius
Answered on 27 Jun 2019
I think most would have went thru this route. I don't know if there is minimum payment on the both, or if its treated as one combined loan. If they are both from cpf, then the interest would be pretty much locked @ 2.5% which ain't too bad (excluding mortgages, lines of credit / credit cards / consolidated loans charge 4+ to over 26% interest). This is a good ground for you to learn how to manage debt. I would suggest you do a budget for your expected first pay (less 20% cpf). Maybe set aside 15 - 20% of your pay and arrange for the giro deduction. If after all expenses and giving family some money, you still have balance savings, you can adjust the monthly repayment gradually. I think I paid off mine in 3+ years. Once you settle the loan, and have gathered discipline to manage your budgets, you can channel the money once used to pay off these loans towards investing via rsp. Dont stress out over 2.5% interest. Credit card interest is the one to fear the most. I have seen quite a few people buried by credit card debt and become bankrupt.

Education

Investments

Elijah Lee
Elijah Lee
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Aug)

Level 8. Wizard
Updated on 28 Jun 2019
I will answer the question with a few additional pointers to address any one else's concerns on the same topic. The things to consider are: 1) What is your time horizon? In your case, with 15 years, it is long enough that you may consider holding some defensive equities. For shorter time horizons, equity holdings may put your investment capital at risk. Equity funds (UT) maybe an alternative to direct investment in equities as well if you are not certain what equities to buy or are only able to allocate a certain amount monthly to build your capital. Fixed income can comprise the rest of your portfolio so as to balance things out. 2) What is your risk appetite? This will determine your allocation of equity/fixed income. The less risk you are able to take, the more your portfolio should shift towards fixed income. Fixed income options may include short duration bond funds, or Singapore Saving Bonds, or bonds such as Astra V. 3) Would a guarantee on part of your funds give you a peace of mind? Then a suitable endowment plan with decent guaranteed returns would form part of your portfolio, ensuring that you have a certain amount of funds ready for at least the school fees, regardless of market conditions when your child commences university. The endowment also has the advantage of having a minimum return with potential upside. However, for these to work well, the duration of the endowment will have to be more than 10 years. Alternatively, short term endowments may be an option. 4) Liquidity. Another consideration is the amount of liquidity that you need to have. One of the on-going costs of university are the daily expenses. To that end, ensure that the portfolio constructed has ample liqudity if your child needs an injection of funds for purchases such as textbooks or laptop. Stocks/UT can be liquidated within days, SSBs take up to a month, and endowments are meant to be held to maturity. Combining all these together will yield a blended portfolio that should adequately address your concern. Re-balancing to take profits is also an important part of the strategy. As an example, an endowment plan can form the basis for ensure funds for the bulk of the school fees, defensive blue chips may provide dividends for daily expenses and unit trusts may provide potential capital appreciation to take care of anything else, expenses wise. The allocation will depend on the 4 factors mentioned above.

Career

Education

Hey there anon!! Here's what I think after analysing your scenario: 1) Assuming the scholarship covers your school fees and gives you a small sum as allowance too, it definitely helps you in potential student debt. 2) Will the total sum of scholarship be as high as whatever you're earning from teaching? Maybe yes, maybe no - you decide on the answer as I don't know the exact value of your scholarship. - If no, then continuing the lessons might seem more worth it, aye? - Additionally, if yes, you get to value add to these students' lives too, right? Seems like everything is in favour of continuing the lessons and earning the 4-6k/month right? Yes (in my opinion), but short term wise. Here's why I think so: 1) Long term wise, the investment in the degree would pay off - literally, it'll give you a better pay as a music educator for sure! 2) Long term (or short term wise - up to you to decide) a recession is coming. Being educated while under a scholarship would be to your advantage than being employed and at multiple risks from the economy. 3) While studying, i'm sure you can still teach part time during the weekends or on your free days! I've had 3-day work weeks in uni before. I'm sure your past clients would continue hiring you or recommend you to others too! Especially given your prior teaching experience. In short, I'm team uni based on what you've presented. Then again, I'm no expert in the music industry or 100% understand how the high qualification you currently possess stands in your industry compared to getting a degree. These are my two cents worth of opinion based on the facts you've presented. Maybe consult a senior in the music indsutry/school too! All the very best in whatever your choice is! :-)
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