Education

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Education
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Jay Liu
    Jay Liu, Sleepyhead at Land of Dreams
    193 Answers, 344 Upvotes
    Answered 5d ago
    I started working when I was 15. As long as its kept minimal(weekends, school holidays) and focusing on studies during exam period.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Steph Yeo
    Steph Yeo, Auntie Uncle Whisperer at Agency for Integrated Care
    82 Answers, 153 Upvotes
    Answered 4w ago
    That work environment sounds like every other office. It’s nothing to worry about. Since you’re intending to do a part-time degree, I think the most important aspect of your job is whether the people embrace such an idea. Is your boss ok that you may need some time off to study? Are your co-workers ok to cover your duties when you’re not at work? If yes, then staying is a good option. As for the job prospect, maybe wait till you’re done with the degree then see how again.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Serene Toh
    Serene Toh
    40 Answers, 80 Upvotes
    Answered on 24 Dec 2018
    If you are going to study political science, with or without the scholarship it might be better to take the scholarships. If you don't like the job after, its more likely that its the course that's wrong for you and not the job (most jobs are the same no matter where you are). If you are taking the course just for the sake of a scholarship and the secure job. You really need to think about it. Research what the course is about and what type of job it will lead to. Then consider if you can tahan or not. Its not just the 5 year bond, its the time & effort in university as well. Most of the time people who take a government job are not looking for excitement, but just want a stable job that they can hold till retirement. Financially, it does make sense, to take the scholarship, only if you want to take that course or if you have no idea what you which course you want to study. if you are the type that can tahan and hold on. take it and use the 5 years to build your first pot of savings.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenichi Xi
    Kenichi Xi, nᴉʍ oʇ dǝnᴉʇsǝd 不能说的秘密 at Tag Team with Gabriel Tham
    149 Answers, 328 Upvotes
    Answered on 15 Jan 2019
    " I studied computer science in the past, because it was believed to be profitable, but dropped out after one year to pursue my passion: teaching. " I think you made the right choice towards teaching. Find out what is burning you out and try to resolve it. Is usually all in your mind. Time vs Money. Unless your next option is really life changing, high chance the profitable dream from CS will not materialise and will make things worst for you. Always embrace what is good around you (teaching is not a bad choice because good students will appreciate you) rather then chasing what you believe is good but in reality, CS is really tough. Hope this helps in anyway. You know yourself Best!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    16 Answers, 58 Upvotes
    Answered on 02 Jan 2019
    1. Try to rationalise what you're feeling right now, where your lack of passion stems from; is it burn out? or do you truly don't enjoy playing the sport? 2. Also rationalise whether you want to take the sport professionally. Having passion for a sport doesn't necessarily mean that you want to develop it into a career for various reasons (e.g. you may think that it's not a healthy career because it's not easy to sustain it once you go beyond the peak). 3. Commnicate to your parents about Points 1 and 2. And also understand why they want you to take it professionally (other than that they've invested large amount of money in you for it). Also take this opportunity to let them know what you would like to do next (or let them know that you want to find something you would like to commit to, if you haven't figure this out). Communication is important, if not the key thing here. Make your voice heard but also remember that they may not necessarily agree with you. But even if they don't agree with you (yet), don't think that you're being ungrateful to want to move away from it. This is your future that we are talking about here. Putting it from another perspective - if you continue with hockey out of "gratefulness" to your parents but because of the lack of passion and interest in the sport anymore, you fail to perform to their expectation (and in this case, the coach's and other investors' expectations). In the worst case scenario, you may not even be able to stay on the team or any professional team, killing your own career too. At that point of time, what are you go to do?
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Gabriel Lee
    Gabriel Lee
    366 Answers, 558 Upvotes
    Answered on 27 Dec 2018
    Go for a short internship stint as the experience will give you a competitive edge and add more value to your portfolio which should come in handy when you're job hunting after you graduate as compared to your peers who might have no experience
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Ck Chai
    Ck Chai
    84 Answers, 126 Upvotes
    Answered on 27 Dec 2018
    I think you should have a talk with him, to find out what may be the problem that he constantly fails. Is it due to his part-timing causing him lack of stamina on his studies? Like Tat Tian suggested, to take 1 semester break to work and save the money, else to fully concentrate on the studies? Or could it be he is struggling to complete the course which he doesn't enjoy studying? If so, will it be better to drop the course, though seemingly wasting money but constantly failing and repeating the modules is just as costly? Maybe he can temporary join the work force, save up the money then go for part-time / full time studies after he is clear what he is interested in.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Ck Chai
    Ck Chai
    84 Answers, 126 Upvotes
    Answered on 26 Dec 2018
    No harm trying, while it seems challenging for the older people to get job in new field, there are a couple of the govt scheme that encourage companies to hire the older folks. And if your desired internship pay is affordable to the company, they might be open to offer an internship!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kok Koon
    Kok Koon
    18 Answers, 64 Upvotes
    Answered on 14 Dec 2018
    Do you have any expectations for his career choice? And what does he want? I was given a slot for accounting in NTU and had 2 years during NS to make a switch. It was my 3rd choice. I was toying with the idea of applying for my other preferred area of study. Accounting wasn't my choice. My sister simply said, "you can take history/geography (any other subject interest) in your free time while taking accountancy (as a professional degree) but not the other way." And that one can achieve an honors, professional degree from a renowed business schools in 3 years sealed the deal. I wanted to get out of school, as fast as possible with the lowest (time and monetary) cost - fulfil my job as a good Singaporean son, take the photo and then carry on with my (real) life. I didn't do well in school but graduated anyway. I was trying different things from online marketing to selling flowers on V day at Orchard Road. Benjamin Loh, a local accounting grad and fellow Seedly community member, shares his experience: https://blog.smu.edu.sg/undergraduate/what-learnt-after-getting-cs-and-ds-during-university/ A few key considerations: 1. Accounting is a professional degree (like lawyers and doctors, we are guided by Accounting Laws and Code of Conduct/Ethics). One cannot be an accountant (CPA/CA) without a formal degree + working experience. On the other hand, the things computer science degree can achieve, one can do on their own time without risking staying in school. Quite honestly, I'm not sure our locals can code as well or fast as the Chinese and Indian undergrads that take the 1st and 2nd class honors in our local unis. My friend entered uni 2 years ahead of me graduated at the same time as he dabao (repeated) 2 sems worth of modules. Suffice to say, a structured program may bring out the best in him in the shortest time - if he has a good computer science degree AND has side projects with many users, he can be a great programmer with Google with 6-figure annual salary in the first year. And I don't know many accounting grads who are paid as well in google as their computing engineers. 2. The value of uni education For me, the value of uni education is not the knowledge but in the building of the analytical mind, collaboration with others, project management, rigour in arguments, being professionally critical. Being in a business school and specifically in accounting does mean that at some point, my friends will become partners in accounting firms, CFOs/CEOs, financial controllers with regional roles - some already are. The alumni link, network, all have value. If I need insights of the job market, internship opportunity for a relative - it's a phone call away. This however, is not confined to accounting. Computer science have their own illustrious alumni, seniors, power connectors that can bring your child to Silicon Valley in double quick time. Why not right? 3. He will be bearing the consequences of his decisions, not you. I guess the fact that you are asking on Seedly (age group 24-35 - mostly) shows your willingness to hear us out. To be honest, no one can give you answers. That's why I started the answers with questions. Your role in the entire conversation is to help him get clarity. Communicate your pride, confidence and support for him through the way you talk to him (focus not the outcome, but the process). Have confidence that having guided him well thus far, he will figure his own path - even if he might take a while. I didn't pursue the lucrative career in accounting. But when I connected the dots backwards, my own interests, natural talents and inclinations are converging in my 30s. I'm not hitting where i think my potential is but I am grateful that I stayed my own course. Some will only realise they are in the wrong place in their 40s, 50s. Not impossible. but will be harder to change then. We have much to learn about parenting ourselves. You are almost done getting your kid to adult. It's something worth looking forward to. Jia you jia you!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Bang Hong
    Bang Hong
    37 Answers, 57 Upvotes
    Answered on 17 Dec 2018
    I am one of the old guys whom was a kid and did similar stuff like what your son did (My era was Maplestory, Gunbound, Conquer Online, Dragonica, Pokemon gameboy trading, etc...). I don't earn money from gaming, I do show people how to complete or how to game with some strategy, (i.e. God of War, WOW, etc). To me it is a journey of growing up with games. I would sugggest you as a parent can monitor him from far. Do give gentle reminder or advises at times but don't be too controlling. I need to understand the right context of "spends more and more time on these game", how much is "more" ? Personally last time I do game average 4-5 hours daily during the 56k dial up era and on holidays I game 8- 10 hours, sometimes 10-15 hours too. I got no comments on "I dont really want to encourage young people to spend their parent's money on games". Because this is their choice, if they don't spend on your son's loot they will spend on else where. For example, you cant limit which shop sell liquor. If one shop doesn't sell, you go to the next. An anology. Just sharing my experience here, if your son isn't doing anything really "bad" or neglect his studies "completely", it is a journey. I paid a price for this journey by having an extra year in Secondary school, but thinking back I will still do the same thing in my own way again.
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