Dividends - Seedly

Dividends

ASK A QUESTION
  • Recent Activity
  • Unanswered
  • Trending

Investments

Dividends

Stocks

Bank Account

Brokerages

Usually the dividends from foreign stocks are credited to your brokerage account. Because the stocks are held in custodian account of the broker. Tax on dividends depend on which country the stocks are from. US, 30% dividend tax. HK, no tax. Malaysia, yes. Can check with broker exactly which country and how much is the dividend tax

Investments

Stocks

Dividends

DBS

UOB

OCBC

Tan Wei Ming
Tan Wei Ming,
Level 5. Genius
Answered 4w ago
Hi, I am also looking into buying bank stocks too. I believe there is a correlation between bank stocks and US futures/US index. I always look at the futures to determine if it is the right time to buy. As US index closed lower so I expect the bank stocks to go down on Monday. I am looking at buying DBS and UOB. All three banks are good but I pick the ones that have higher dividend yield. DBS is giving $1.20/share for dividend from FY2018 onwards and UOB started giving $1.20 too after including the special dividend. I am looking at buying them at batches as I would expect that there is more room to drop.

MoneyOwl

Stashaway

Autowealth

Smartly

Robo-Advisors

Dividends

Investments

Endowus

Kenneth Lou
Kenneth Lou, Co-founder at Seedly
Level 8. Wizard
Updated 3w ago
To answer your first question, yes your dividends are re-invested back into the portfolio. It will go back into your account and it will be whon in the transaction statement monthly. In fact, I think most robo advisors witholding tax will all apply. If you transfer that amount into your Robo-advisor account (it is basically their bank account) the total amount will be managed by them (usually they will keep a small % as cash) but almost 95% or more will be invested based on your risk preference and appetite. Hope this helps!

Investments

Stocks

Dividends

Ericsson Ting
Ericsson Ting,
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 27 May 2019
Cash dividend definitely,with cash you will have the flexibility to spend or reinvest the amount,plus it is shiok ti see money coming into your account without "working"

SeedlyTV EP05

Dividends

Investments

REITs

Let me give an example here: Let's say the dividend is $1 per share. If the price is $100, the dividend yield is $1/$100 = 1% If the price is $200, the dividend yield is $1/$200= 0.5% So the amount given is the same but based on the share price the % or yield changes.

Dividends

Investments

REITs

SeedlyTV EP05

I would open a separate account and collect all those dividends. I will use it to reinvest into the counters when opportunity arises. You might want to explore a bit into other markets such as etfs, bond funds to balance out your portfolio.

SeedlyTV EP05

REITs

Dividends

Stocks

Takingstock @
Takingstock @,
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered 2w ago
I use sgxcafe for tracking, as well as my own excel. I rely on sgxcafe's calculations and data retrieval for the most part, but the returns I just take a look and that's it. Its all automated, and I dont mind paying 35 per year to support the app because I like to benchmark myself against selected shared portfolios (yeah when the info is there, you can't help comparing right? I'm happy if my three year return is above median) My pet peeve is looking at the projected dividends ($ amt), I update them into excel and track the amt by month to forecast next year's dividend.

Arcc Event

Investments

Forex (FX)

Dividends

Forex is trading with currency pairs. Currency (like SGD) do not pay out dividends because these are not companies generating revenue to payout. However, trading in forex will involve swap rates. You will notice that sometimes you get credited or debited some from your account balance. This is because holding currencies overnight incur interest.

Investments

Dividends

Buy and own the stock before it goes XD or ex-dividend Once it goes to XD or ex-dividend, it means they will start to record who are the owners eligible for the dividend. Then these owners will get the dividend on the dividend payout date.

Investments

Dividends

Isaac Chan
Isaac Chan, Business at NUS
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (May)

Level 8. Wizard
Answered on 06 May 2019
I would say to pay more attention to the cashflow statements of the company, especially their operating and investing cashflows. Dividend Payout Ratio looks at Net Profit as the basis of comparison, but net profits and cash flow are different. Moreover, dividends paid out are usually based on cash flow and not just profits. Also, it would be good to take a look at the cash balance the company has, and compare it with their cashflow statements. Companies might still pay out dividends even if cash flows aren't looking too good for a speicific year because they have a lot of cash on hand.
Load more questions