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  • Asked by Anonymous

    Adrian Goh Jun Wei
    Adrian Goh Jun Wei, Computer Science at Nanyang Technological University
    17 Answers, 32 Upvotes
    Answered on 10 Aug 2018
    Tee-Ming has shared his very useful and concise insights here! :)
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    Plenty of good can come out of this. America loses billions of dollars to illegal immigration every year. Now imagine even a fraction of that money focused on the economy, and then a fraction of that ending up in your pocket (since we almost always inevitably use US currency or invest in some US Equities, which affect the global market, and then...)...
  • Asked by Anonymous

    HC Tang
    HC Tang, Financial Enthusiast, Budgeting at The Society

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    360 Answers, 869 Upvotes
    Updated on 24 Sep 2018
    I have a couple friend in the same situations. So what they do is that , only a daily basis, they live normally and don't go for things that is too much or beyond what the guy can pay for. Dates/ meals etc will be shared equally, so that it is also fair to the guy (partly this takes care of the guy's feeling) and help him to save for future funds for marriage / wedding / family planning. On the other hand, since you earn more, save it. When you guys would like to settle down, you can one shot pay more for the downpayment, CPF, house renovations etc and if you can avoid using CPF and use cash, by all means do so as this will allow more cash kept in both of your CPF for long term earning interest and retirement. Housing is for long term use and both can enjoy and whoever can contribute more contribute more, with more payment settle using cash, both of you can be free without having worry if have enough CPF OA to pay for housing especially on his side. After marriage the guy will have to be the father and do more phsyical work, handyman, cleaning etc, so it's quite balance. The key is: 1) Always don't spend more than what he can afford (except housing since it is a long term 1 time thing only that both of you and future children can enjoy) , AA style cost sharing for meals, movies, entertainment always. So that it takes care of his income/savings and feeling. 2) Don't outsource everything with $. Purposely ask and make the guy do some of the work to ensure that he is always needed. Like help you to do something. This will instill a sense of purpose and allows him to contribute beyond monetary. It is not about his ego, but more of allow the guy to contribute in another way other than $ to balance out the scale between the 2 of you. 3) Most of all, always ask privately how he thinks / or feel for things that requires to spend $ on so that the both of you will always be in close, good communications and takes care of feeling on both side, that is the key to good relationship.. Finally, I would like to say it is a good thing because higher + lower income also allow a chance for better life and balance can always be achieve in another way, not only $. Live life ignoring the social norm or what others think or say because the relationship is about the 2 of you and not others. It's not about how others live but about how the 2 of you would like to live. Cheers! Have a happy Life ! :)
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Yong Kah Hwee
    Yong Kah Hwee

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    458 Answers, 621 Upvotes
    Answered 4d ago
    3-5% a year should be a reasonable amount!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Hariz Arthur Maloy
    Hariz Arthur Maloy, Independent Financial Advisor at Promiseland Independent

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    295 Answers, 494 Upvotes
    Answered 5d ago
    Absolutely! I'm not that normal, so I have about 6 things running at the same time including my career. But it's good to have other streams of income. Never rely fully on just one.
  • Asked by Anonymous

  • Asked by Anonymous

    Brandan Chen
    Brandan Chen, Financial Planner at Manulife Singapore
    153 Answers, 224 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    I was at the same stage as you about 8 years back. I chose to go into the sales line selling Time Magazine and other educational editorials to schools. The pay was great then about S$3k per month for 3 months considering that I just finished NS. The skills and people that I met during that short stint really taught me some life skills such as Communication, Relationship Management, Sales, Public Speaking etc. As for internships, it would also be beneficial if you know what you intend to pursue later on in the career. Given an option to turn back time, i woud still have gone for the sales job which i took up since the next 4 years in University would easily expose me to internships after internships every summer break
  • Asked by Anonymous

    HC Tang
    HC Tang, Financial Enthusiast, Budgeting at The Society

    Top Contributor (Jan)

    360 Answers, 869 Upvotes
    Answered 3w ago
    Try this too: https://blog.seedly.sg/5-ways-make-extra-money-on-side-low-commitment/ 3-4 hours a day if you can teach then go for tuition, otherwise even if you don't wanna try, can find out from others how much can they make if is doing food delivery for all the platform. Hope it heps! Happy Hustle hustle! :)
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Xinyi Lum
    Xinyi Lum, Content Strategist at Seedly
    38 Answers, 105 Upvotes
    Updated on 28 Nov 2018
    I have a teacher friend who has a similar dilemma as the one you're currently facing. She's much older than I am, and has gone through a few phases of her life while I watched and learnt. Like you, she waited to have kids and progressed fast up the leadership track in school and now holds a managerial role in a reputable school. Her goals were clear from the start: career-first. But in a recent meetup with her she did coax me not to be as 'silly' as her and always find a balance (guess there's a reason why the term work-life-balance exists). She's probably way past the age of having a kid at this point in her life and she has accepted that fact, but struggles/regrets a little. Back then, if she had kids, they would have grown up by now while she would have also meandered her way to the top (more stress and hard work and maybe not as high a position as now) but it's all a give and take kind of situation. I guess if you do make a choice to follow your goals (kids or career etc.) then stick with it for the long run. Jia you!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Yu Ming Jin
    Yu Ming Jin
    1 Answers, 5 Upvotes
    Answered on 29 Nov 2018
    Although in sum it seem to be beneficial for the family, I strongly advice against it as it will definitely strain the relationship. Gender roles still play a large role in the Singaporean family, and it too, is part of your husband's identity. He might feel emasculated if he is made to stay at home to take care of the children. If there is one thing that harms relationships, it is to make either spouse feel unappreciated is his/her main duty such that someone has to step in and do the job for him/her. I.e. my mum gets fustrated when my dad interferes with the way she lectures me when I was young. Sounds like a rational choice on the surface, but in the long run, it might be pernicious if you husband does it unwillngly. Financially speaking, your husband will lose out on years of working experience if he suddenly stops his job to take care of the kids. Will be "paiseh" for him to explain why he has stopped work to take care of the young kids when he finds work again; Singaporeans care about "face" alot. Communication is key. Perhaps, there could be a mutual compromise.
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