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Huang Yixuan
Huang Yixuan, Product Designer at Seedly
Level 6. Master
Updated 2d ago
Hey! Here are some things you might want to take note of. 1. What do you want to avoid? What are the bad experiences that you've encountered? Bad boss? Tough hours? List it down and you'll know what kind of jobs you want to avoid. 2. What are your strengths? Any particular skills you have? Don't neglect soft skills! Perhaps you are very meticulous, or perhaps you are very good at talking to people. Keep these in mind. 3. What do you prefer? Would you rather fixed timing (eg. 9-5) or random hours (like your events job)? Does colleagues and work environment matter more to you, or pay? Don't be afraid just because of some bad experiences! It's all about luck actually and I sincerely do hope that you'd be able to find a job that you love in the end (:

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Salary

Income tax high is very relative. Our income taxes are much lower compared to many developed countries eg in Europe or USA. If your bonus covers your income tax, then you are a high earner for sure. The tiered structure for our income taxes means that higher earners will pay more as they move up the brackets. But it is a good way to think that bonuses are not extra money for us to spend.. Means you will be saving it more than spending it away!

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I'll spend 10 to 20% upgrading myself to earn more in the future. I'll probably use 5% to pamper myself if there's some place i really wanna go or something I really want. Balance save it for current or future investment. There are too many ways to spend $ but limited ways to invest good for future. Best to delay gratification than regret later.

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Junus Eu
Junus Eu,
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (May)

Level 8. Wizard
Answered 3d ago
Straight from IRAS: All payments and benefits derived from the carrying on of blogging, advertising and any other activity performed on social media platforms as a trade or business constitute gains or profits from a trade or a business under section 10(1)(a) of the Income Tax Act (ITA). Payments in exchange for services performed by bloggers/social media influencers can take the form of money, goods or services. All monetary and non-monetary payments / benefitsin-kind are taxable if they are received in return for services rendered or to be rendered by bloggers/social media influencers. Any benefit whether monetary or in-kind provided to the families and friends of bloggers/social media influencers will be taxable on the bloggers/social media influencers. The following are excluded in terms of declaration: Bloggers/social media influencers will not be required to declare non-monetary benefits if the following two conditions are met: (a) The product/service is given to them on an ad-hoc basis for one-off consumption or testing; and (b) The value of each product/service received does not exceed $100. If the value of the product/service exceeds $100, the full value of the benefit should be declared and be subjected to tax. The $100 threshold does not apply to non-monetary benefits received by bloggers/social media influencers if it is a recurring supply provided over a period of time Source: https://www.iras.gov.sg/irashome/uploadedFiles/IRASHome/Businesses/Social%20Media%20Influencer.pdf

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Lifestyle

The key here is to only switch if you have secured the job offer elsewhere. Job market is not good, don't quit without an offer signed.

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Gavin Tan
Gavin Tan,
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered 2w ago
Hey there I'm 19 this year as well, gonna enlist next year as I'm in my final year of poly. When I was young all my savings were given to my parents, and I only started to save for myself when I was 17. Right now I have about roughly 5k in investments and cash. Would have more but mostly spent on my girlfriends and drinking haha. I think that for now, the amount to have is not the important part, but what you actually do with the money. Do you invest? Do you just save? A good advice I'd say is save till around 10k, and then start investing in the stock market!! Good luck man jyjy!

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General

Fresh Graduates

Randy Chai
Randy Chai,
Level 4. Prodigy
Updated 2w ago
Hi there, Breaking down your question into 2 parts: 1. Would you intern at a new small startup with reputable founders and investor backing? 2. Would you intern at a company that has just started your department and haven't even hired your direct superior yet? My personal opinion is that you should choose an internship/company that puts you in the best possible learning environment/position to gain knowledge and experience that can be the most beneficial for your personal and future career development. ! Some questions that I often ask myself prior to choosing an internship: 1. Am I able to learn and/or gain sufficient knowledge and/or experience in this role, from this company? 2. Am I able to learn and/or gain sufficient knowledge and/or experience from my mentors in this company? 3. Would there be a chance that I will come back to this company as a career option when I’m done with school? You should consider your internship objectives and what you see yourself doing for a career after you’re done with school. For example, if you are a fresh graduate and aspire to work in a bank, it’s good to know that a bank will more likely hire a fresh graduate that has done at least one internship with a bank/financial institution as compared to a candidate that has not done an internship with a banks or financial institution. Next, what is your career interest? E.g. Operations, Sales, Marketing, Accounting, Engineering or Design? Generally speaking, roles don’t really matter if you’re interning at an early stage Startup (Series A and lower). As more often than not, your job scope will consist of multiple roles across various functions. However, for a later stage Startup, it would matter more as your role will tend to be much more defined and focused. The good thing about joining smaller Startups is that very often you will be able to work closely with the founders. You will be able to gain hands-on and in-depth experience on building a company, starting something from scratch with limited resources, running a department and/or launching a product. This would be a great learning experience for you which money can’t buy and no schools can teach! As compared to working for a larger scale startup/company, you tend to experience less as your job scope and task are much more defined, lesser responsibilities and cross-functional tasks (but more in-depth). Also, a larger scale startup/company would tend to have sufficient or surplus of resources which allow them to hire every necessary/available position in their company while a smaller scale startup/company often have to bootstrap and have their employees/interns stretched across multiple roles. Overall, it is important to understand that there will be higher risk and uncertainties involved when working for a startup as compared to working for an SME/Corporation. Therefore, it is good to be aware of/understand the fundraising stages and financial health of the Startup. As from there, you can work backwards the potential runway that the Startup has, which would be rather important if you’re doing a longer-term internship, i.e. 6-12 months duration. In conclusion, if you find that the role matches your interest and you're able to learn and gain sufficient knowledge/experience from the founders, then you should definitely take on this internship opportunity. However, the only red flag here is that usually, a company would first bring in a lead/manager (who will be in charge of this new department) and then have the lead/manager to hire his/her own team. This way the company can reduce the risk of having a mismatch of personalities/working relationships between its managers and his/her team. I hope this will help. Have fun jumping onboard this Rocketship!
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Lok Yang Teng
Lok Yang Teng,
Level 6. Master
Answered 2w ago
Hi! You may want to take a look at this by DBS: https://www.dbs.com.sg/sme/businessclass.page

Career

Education

Hey there anon!! Here's what I think after analysing your scenario: 1) Assuming the scholarship covers your school fees and gives you a small sum as allowance too, it definitely helps you in potential student debt. 2) Will the total sum of scholarship be as high as whatever you're earning from teaching? Maybe yes, maybe no - you decide on the answer as I don't know the exact value of your scholarship. - If no, then continuing the lessons might seem more worth it, aye? - Additionally, if yes, you get to value add to these students' lives too, right? Seems like everything is in favour of continuing the lessons and earning the 4-6k/month right? Yes (in my opinion), but short term wise. Here's why I think so: 1) Long term wise, the investment in the degree would pay off - literally, it'll give you a better pay as a music educator for sure! 2) Long term (or short term wise - up to you to decide) a recession is coming. Being educated while under a scholarship would be to your advantage than being employed and at multiple risks from the economy. 3) While studying, i'm sure you can still teach part time during the weekends or on your free days! I've had 3-day work weeks in uni before. I'm sure your past clients would continue hiring you or recommend you to others too! Especially given your prior teaching experience. In short, I'm team uni based on what you've presented. Then again, I'm no expert in the music industry or 100% understand how the high qualification you currently possess stands in your industry compared to getting a degree. These are my two cents worth of opinion based on the facts you've presented. Maybe consult a senior in the music indsutry/school too! All the very best in whatever your choice is! :-)

Career

Eveline Lau
Eveline Lau,
Level 5. Genius
Answered 3w ago
Don't really understand your question of "highly value" skilled jobs - highly valued skilled jobs or high-value skilled jobs? They would mean different things. If you're talking about more labourous kind of skilled jobs, you'll need a license and they can be high risk (e.g. compromise on health or safety). If you're talking about non-labourous ones, you'll need to be at least educated at the tertiary level on it (e.g. graduated from medical school to be a doctor, law school for a lawyer). Tuition teachers can earn quite a bit of money but in order to be one that can rack in the money, you'll need to be a MOE-certified teacher, meaning you would need to have studied in and graduated from NIE. Studying in NIE comes with a 5-year bond, which you'll need to serve by working as a teacher in a public school. The money comes with sacrifice, just in which form :p
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