My daughter (14) wants to start her own business of baking and selling cookies. Her studies are above average but could be improved. Should I support this idea? - Seedly

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Asked by Anonymous

Asked on 06 Dec 2018

My daughter (14) wants to start her own business of baking and selling cookies. Her studies are above average but could be improved. Should I support this idea?

On one hand I'm proud of her for wanting to earn her own money, and think that it is a good experience. On the other hand I think she should also focus on her studies.

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Questions is, why not ? :)

But as always, one should finish at least tertiary studies as much as possible for backup and basic as a fallback plan because if it doesn't work out, she can always go back to work for someone or do something else. I believe that parents should always be supporting and encourange children to persue their passion and interest and start young because that's the best time without much commitment and responsibilities, so they can learn / understand better and go much further that us.

Why not encourage and help her to register HDB home sole proprietorship and take some home order for events / birthdays / parties and sell cakes , muffins and cookies. But have a talk with her and both agree that studies must comes first and as long as she do her best in her studies, you'll support her in the business.

Who knows, maybe before she enter university it is then possible to have the scale to make it a shop and business to fund her own university fees and carve out a living and passion or even be a famous chef one day ! :)

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Leong Wen Fong
Question Poster

06 Dec 2018

Is she allowed to register at 14 though? or does it have to be under my name?
HC Tang
HC Tang

06 Dec 2018

nope. Has to 18 hence has to register under your name. See HDB home-based small scale business scheme: https://www.hdb.gov.sg/cs/infoweb/residential/living-in-an-hdb-flat/home-business/home-based-small-scale-business-scheme Need to register Sole-proprietorship under ACRA also, and need to be at least 18, so have to put under your name till she' reach the legal age. See here: https://www.acra.gov.sg/components/wireframes/howToGuidesChapters.aspx?pageid=1087#1089
Junus Eu
Junus Eu
Top Contributor

Top Contributor (Jun)

Level 8. Wizard
Answered on 05 Apr 2019

Of course! There is nothing more important than a supportive parent.

Wanting to start her own business is commendable, and think about all the life skills she will learn along the way:

  1. Budgeting (cost of ingredients, cost of packaging, marketing costs)
  2. Thinking of ways to make the business profitable
  3. Thinking of ways to get the word out

These are the exact skills that students in business school are taught, so I don't see why not!

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Vicky Faith
Vicky Faith
Level 5. Genius
Answered on 07 Dec 2018

Maybe instead of a business, try to start from small buy supporting her as a hobby first! Setting up business is not something that easy and she probably need to go through NEA course to get herself certified to be a food handler before she can make this into a business for commercial world. I doubt shes able to take that cert yet.

But a dream has no limit, so you can always co-create the pathway with her by starting small. I dont have a child, but I felt like if you allow her to continue baking and support her financially (for now at least), it would work out in a short term. Let her bake an distribute as a birthday gift, valentines days, Christmas and many more. Maybe for her to use her time and effort to bake and distribute to her friends, she will gain a few valuable lessons too (ie. Importance of appreciation, hygiene... a lot more)

This comment really worth less than 1 cent because I got zero experience in this but yet I wanna share my POV haha.

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Npm Adele
Npm Adele
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 07 Dec 2018

Why not?

If she really thinks she enjoys it, why not nurture her entrepreneurial spirit, provide her an outlet to destress and nurture her creativity, as well as support her in improving her EQ and becoming a more well-rounded individual?

You can let her try, and guide her along the way. Open her mind to the workings of the outside world. Especially during the school holidays.

You can set limits during school term, such as limiting her orders to once over the weekend, and limit order quantity.

During the school holidays, you can provide a safe outlet for your daughter to pursue her passions, a supportive family to confide in and an avenue to become a well-rounded individual. You can let her learn skills on how to market and grow her business, and new products for sale , such as encourage her to do free digital marketing/google adwords/ consumer behaviour/baking/baking decoration/food hygiene/web deisgn etc courses. Encoruage her to think about what and how she wants to sell. Nurture her ability to focus. Grow that entrepreneurial spirit.

If it affects her studies or she gets tempted to do more during school term, I'd say why not let her try once? Sometimes, only when we fall will we learn the lesson. Experience is a very good teacher. Let her learn to manage her own time, self-discipline and critical thinking. She is big enough to be responsible for her studies.

She would probbly be more grateful for the opportunity then to be left regretful and thinking, "what if"?

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Earlene TaN
Earlene TaN
Level 2. Rookie
Updated on 07 Jun 2019

Definitely! Perhaps managing her business could help her do better in maths, languages in her course of communication and sciences while baking and accounts. Supporting her would mean the world to her as long as she agrees not to let her grades slip. Your support in her interest may help her realised not to let her parents down in terms of wanting her studies to be on track. She is so lucky to have her parents looking out for her.

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Leong Wen Fong
Question Poster

06 Dec 2018

That's a way to think about it that I haven't thought of- thanks!
Daniel Lee
Daniel Lee, Growth Marketing Lead at Seedly
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 10 Dec 2018

Whilst studies are definitely important, learning things outside the classroom are too. I think it's really good that she has interest in doing a business! Learning from wins and failures via such entrepreneurial outlets are good especially when she's still young.

Would be good to teach her the ins and outs of running a business. And more so if it's the holidays now. All in all, as long as this does not affect her studies, it's a good avenue for her to spend her free time doing.

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Nau Hauser
Nau Hauser
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 09 Dec 2018

I would definitely encourage it but start small. She can start selling to family relatives than learn more about the business on the go. The key to this is start small and work from there like a lemonade stand. I wouldn't advise to wait because the interest may be gone and you'd lose valuable time and impetus. Starting small will help to balance school work and learn on the go. It'll help offset too any huge potential loses. For example start with a hand held mixer which can easily be purchased for $50 rather than a cake mixer etc., good luck!

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Gabriel Lee
Gabriel Lee
Level 6. Master
Answered on 09 Dec 2018

Yes so long as she can manage and cope alongside with her studies at the same time. As a post-millenial, I strongly believe that it'll be a very good experience and addition to her portfolio as she can share about it during her interviews in the future. E.g. She can share about her baking/cookies business (entrepreneurship) during a scholarship interview.

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Eric Lim
Eric Lim
Level 2. Rookie
Answered on 06 Dec 2018

Go ahead! It's great learning opportunity for her. Treat it like a CCA and u will have peace with urself. Just let her know, whatever it is, studies come first.

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Elsa Goh
Elsa Goh
Level 5. Genius
Answered on 06 Dec 2018

It's pretty common. If you're willing to provide her with funds with the understanding that she might lose them all, why not? Would suggest giving her only a fixed amount of funds though. If she runs out - too bad. If you don't have funds though - too bad also nothing to talk.

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Wang Wei Yao
Wang Wei Yao
Level 1. Freshie
Updated on 04 Jun 2019

Yes. You should support her. Who knows. She might be a famous Baker or owner of her own bakery. But she MUST discover how to sell, ways to sell and the pricing also must be reasonable ect.

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