If I die, how does my insurance agent know that I am dead? - Seedly
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Anonymous

Asked on 11 Jul 2020

If I die, how does my insurance agent know that I am dead?

Out of curiosity, I am interested to know how would an insurance agent know if I am dead and act upon the necessary policies in place. Hypothetically let's say that I am single and the only who knows what insurance I have gotten. Interested to find out what some experienced agents think/have done.

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As part of my professional practice, I meet my clients at least once every 6 months. This is to ensure that we keep each other in check.

More Details:

The Importance for a Semi-Annual Financial Portfolio Review

In like manner, I will invite my clients to enrol into the Witness Programme. Through this programme, I will get to know 3 closest people in my client's life. When death occurs, I may not be the first to know. However, either of the 3 person will know and inform me. Thereafter, I will fulfil my role and assist my client in claim and other related matters.

I share quality content on estate planning and financial planning here.​​​

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Kenneth Lou
Kenneth Lou

4w ago

I never knew about the witness program, looks interesting!

It would be good to let someone in your family know that you have bought life insurance and set out nominations of your policies (including your CPF). Your agent should also be responsible enough to check in with you at least once a year.

A simple way would be to keep your agent's name card somewhere.

Eg. your wallet, fridge, policy folder with your insurance policy documents, calendars/ planners if your agent has provided you with any ​​​

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If you are single with no beneficiaries, is there a particular reason for you getting death insurance? I would assume that the larger reason is to obtain disability insurance instead. The solution is often to simply do a nomination and inform the nominated party you have done your nomination. In most cases, the person should be close enough to you to know that you are dead.

Witness program can be used, but I have not met anyone who gets insurance with no one in mind to protect for. If you have a next-of-kin, they will handle your affairs during your departure. If you have no NOK and did not make a nomination, it will simply fall under the Intestate succession act.​​​

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Make a will and register it in the Will Registry. Just tell your family that you have a will. Upon death, your family can get will from the registry with the death cert.

Your Will Executor will identify and consolidate all assets including bank deposits, CPF, insurances, investments, real estate, etc.

He/she/it (if it is an institution e.g. Rockwill) will distribute the estate to your beneficiaries and trustees according to your will.

I find going the will route is better, as it is one centralised control centre. It goes by percentage of your entire net worth (excluding CPF nomination).

For example (total 100%):

Parents - 60%

Sibling - 20%

Pet - 10%

Charity - 5%

Girlfriend/Boyfriend - 5%

Whatever you want to put in your will. You can even put specific wishes/conditions like, a memorial ad in the papers upon death etc.

Below is from my financial advisor when I asked him that time:

"a.) If you do a Will followed by an Insurance Nomination, the Nomination stands. Then, if you change your Will later, the Will stands.

b.) If you do a Insurance Nomination followed by a Will, the Will stands. Then, if you change your Insurance Nomination, the Nomination stands.

The main purpose of the nomination is to discharge the insurance company's obligations legally. As it only covers specific policies and may cause confusion as things change (will change), it is easier and clearer to manage through a Will.

2.) For CPF Nomination, the monies will go to your parents (default by law if you are single) if no nomination. So, you need to do a CPF nomination if you want to include (someone else or a charitable institution)."

Hope this gives you another perspective. To me, I don't have to worry whether my agent knows or not.

If he knows, he can just come to pay respect and see a Catholic peaceful wake when the time comes, donate his bai jin (which will go to the church), enjoy the buffet spread, talk and laugh with my relatives, network a bit (maybe can even get some business hahaha), ask how I went home to the Lord~ etc.

A chillax atmosphere...no need to handle financial headache for me.

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Kenneth Lou
Kenneth Lou, Co-founder at Seedly
Level 9. God of Wisdom
Answered 4w ago

This is such a real (but morbid) question... always keep a record of your policies, ideally on the cloud or home safe.

And make sure your family members are aware of your policy numbers and quantum.

I personally have a excel sheet on google drive with these documents.

2 comments

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Al Vida
Al Vida

4w ago

And only you know the password to these account?
Kenneth Lou
Kenneth Lou

4w ago

Shared access to the google folders!
Youtube channel : Say Do Invest
Youtube channel : Say Do Invest
Level 5. Genius
Answered on 11 Jul 2020

Legit question. But I would presume your spouse or your family members should know the insurance products that you bought (if you are implying how you can do the claim after your passing)

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Tang Ching Pang
Tang Ching Pang

4w ago

Trust me , they don't . Even you intend to tell them now , they won't show interest too. Maybe keep a physical record is the only way haha