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Wilson Nid A Break

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Wilson Nid A Break

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Wilson Nid A Break

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Investments

Stocks

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 04 Jun 2019
Haw Par corporation

SeedlyTV EP05

REITs

Investments

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 29 May 2019
Hong Kong reits 1) no withholding tax for dividends and capital gains 2) exposure to Hong Kong & Greater China assets (if it suit your investment appetite) 3) HK stocks trade around the same time as Sg stocks, no need to monitor overnight to execute trades 4) Property & rental income in HK always managed to rebound post recession

Investments

REITs

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 29 May 2019
To me it’s a buy, if you look at its price trajectory throughout 2018, it was a collapse in the 1H (likely ignited by fears of further US interest rates hikes) followed by a gradual recovery in the 2H. But the financial & operating fundamentals for Parkway Life reit still remain strong and unchanged with dividends consistently increasing for 2018. Hence, theoretically speaking its share price for 2018 should actually be better than 2017, however that did not happen in hindsight. My personal opinion, it should have more legs to climb, in order to catch up with the step back it took during 2018. Further more, there will be some investors shunning from more riskier equities to more defensive stocks in light of the US-China trade tensions. The yield looked compressed now because it’s using the current dividend. As a long-term investor you had to look at the forward dividends and subsequent yield-of-cost. Just take a small position first, and monitor whether your want to buy more on the dip should it correct.

Savings

Career

Family

Bank Account

Investments

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 29 May 2019
If you had NO academic/theory background in Maritime Studies, then might be worth considering taking it. the master degree can also help you in establishing your first circle of network for this industry However, this industry is more of a learning-on-the job, so there's still plenty you need to learn on the practical side even when you obtained a "MSc in Maritime Studies". A more viable (cost-effective) route would be taking the qualifications from Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers (best if you get subisdy/sponsor by your company) while working in the industry. http://www.ics.org.sg/qualifications All in all, a Masters in Maritime Studies, is just one of the many ways to enter the industry. Beside, Singapore is currently the maritime hub of the world to be in, so there's no lack of opportunities if you keep knocking on the "doors". Lastly, I would recommend working 1-3 years after your BSc before taking your MSc. Not many employers want to hire someone with a MSc with no working experience these days, and you might end up competing for the same jobs with people with only BSc qualifications.

Investments

Dividends

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Updated on 05 May 2019
1) Growth of Dividends Fundamentals analysis of the long-term outlook of the industry & whether the company itself had the inherent and/or competitive advantages to exploit the most of the favorable macro-environment. Management’s tendency to reward shareholders when earnings see substantial improvement & consistent dividend payouts that do not waver despite stock fluctuations. When there’s a gain on divestment of assets, would the mgmt choose to distribute back to the shareholders? 2) Sustainability of Dividends Dividend payout ratio of less than 100% Dividend cash distributions less than the free cash flow generated A sufficient amount of / gradually accretive retained earnings account that company can dipped into to maintain/increase dividends Low level of liabilities (in particular non-interest bearing liabilities) 3) Tax status of Dividends Is the dividends received by the investor subjected to taxation of his place of residency? Is the dividends subjected to withholding taxes before it can be remitted overseas to a foreign investor?

Investments

Stocks Discussion

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Updated on 18 Apr 2019
Being vested in Haw Par stock is akin to having exposure to 3 key sectors: 1) Healthcare medicinal products (Tiger balm ointment & sister products) 2) Bank (via stakes in UOB, one of the 3 blue-chip local banks) 3) Property (via stakes in UOL, one of the leading property company in SG). The interesting thing about Tiger Balm is that its a age-old household brand name, which carried tons of brand awarness when it comes to pain-relief solutions. The Tiger Balm ointment recipe is also difficult to be replicated by its competitors. Hence, its heartening to know that the company had been effectively exploiting this strategic advantage and carried out product extensions such as mosquito repellent patch, pain-relieving patch etc. They also seek to distribute their products via 3rd party networks & partnerships, reducing/eliminating the need to set up storefronts which result in capital layouts & recurring maintanence expenses. When it comes to their investments holdings in UOB & UOL, they are quite the shrewd investor. Quoted from their 2018 annual report "The Group elected to receive $47.6 million (2017: $25.2 million) of dividend income as scrip shares in lieu of cash dividends during the year. With the higher share base as the Group progressively opted for scrip shares in lieu of cash dividends, coupled with the increase in dividend rate, dividend income from strategic investments increased 64%". So at first instance, it might seem that in 2016 & 2017, their dividend income had shrank. But in reality, they are opting to re-invest and took advantage of lower share prices to hold on to more shares that had consistent dividend growth. Last but not least, not only Haw Par had very low liabilities in total, it also had very limited interest bearing debt, such that its trade & other payables exceed its borrowings. This speak volumes on the conservative & prudent financial approach that the mgmt take. No fancy financial instruments, very straight forward, clean & lean debt profile. All in all, H02 is not really an exciting growth or high yield stock. Its more of a "slow & steady" stock that rewards shareholders over the long horizon, with more gradual upward price movements than sharp downward movements.

Investments

General

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 18 Apr 2019
Beside the usual red flags, there are other things to take note as below: 1. The inability of the share price to rebound over time along with its peers after a market correction like recent times, an indication that its fundamentals is subjected to scrutiny & suspect by market. Even though it might seem like a value buy at first instance, there are times could turn out to be a value trap. Etc see Breadtalk's share price, it had been in a stagnant mode since the 2018 market collapse, most stocks had send a rebound for the past 2-3 months meantime. 2. The reluctantness of management to reward shareholders over time, even though company is generating freecash flow or received gains via divestment & kept hoarding the cashpile with no intention to either expand the biz or do R&D etc 3. Mgmt incentives not aligned with shareholders' interest such as mgmt's lion share of their compensation derived from asset acqusition rather than improving the bottomline

Stocks Discussion

Investments

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Updated on 11 Apr 2019
Was looking at First Reit vs Parkway Reit to decide which one would be my first entry to healthcare sector. Eventually, I decided on Parkway Reit as First Reit had 3 inherent weakness that I am personally not comfortable with regardless of how well it performed in the past & possibly into the future. 1.High concentration risk in One Country: Indonesia Its Singapore & S.Korea portfolio is negligible compared to its Indonesia ones. Indonesia its not a country thats quite well regarded when it comes to policy consistency (look at the change in tax-policy effect on Lippo Mall Reit). Persistent rupiah devaluation to sgd since the start of 2000s, this means that any forex hedging exercise undertaken would still had its limits once it expired. Those who are affluent would always go to Singapore, Thailand etc where the quality of healthcare is better & the scenery is more pleasant. 2. High concentration tenant risk: Lippo Karawaci If the portfolio already had a high geographical concentration risk, the last thing I will like to see its a high tenant concentration, regardless how reputable/blue-chip the tenant is. 3. Nature of the asset lease: 30 year-old Build-Operate-Transfer So in essence, once the 30 year lease finished its course, the land along with the facilities on top of it would be in the ownership of the government. So whether the lease can be extend/renewed with resounding confidence is a question mark. I rather not take the chance. Cheers

Investments

STI ETF

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Updated on 10 Apr 2019
So basically you had 5k in spare cash every month, the next question is how to allocate this 5k into different portfolios. My following suggestion is based on the fact that you are relatively young (can afford to be more aggressive), typical average investors seeking average/decent returns w.r.t average risk that do not want to constantly monitor market and/or little time/desire to pick out individual companies's financial statements etc. Here's my suggestion: 1. Build up an emergency cash funds 3-6 months worth of expenses. ($500 per month, 10%) This portfolio will be your "Pay-youself" fund to always ensure you had a financial safety net, on top your CPF savings. No hard & fast rules on the number on months, dependent on one's individual circumstances. For example, if you had dependants, a monthly mortgage, low job security then the emergency cash funds could likely exceed 6 months. This cash fund could be parked in a high-interest savings account and/or Singapore Savings Bonds (SSBs). Once you hit your targeted emergency cash fund amounts, you can just deploy the $500 to CPF-SA top-ups to get tax relief & earn up to 5% interest (almost risk-free). 2. Next put your monies to work via ETFs ($1,500 each per month for STI & US-index ETFs, thats $3k in total, 60%) The ETFs will be your "Time-in-the market" fund, always stay vested regardless of near-term market fluctuations, betting on the fact that 10/20/30 years down the road, things will eventually pay off. You alr made the first step by DCA to STI ETF, the next step is to consider adding US-index ETF which had historically & statistically proven to be far superior in terms of growth. "When should I stop DCA in STI ETF?" - Once again, no hard & fast rule, perhaps set an $X amount of target value for STI ETF to be in your portfolio. Eg: Once ETF reach $10k/$15k/$20k, stop buying into it and redeploy to other investments products. 3. Lastly, invest the remaining into dividend-yield stocks ($1,500 per month for REITS etc, 30%) This will be your "Pay-your-expense" fund, dividend income from these stocks could pay a meal/transportation/utilities bill. Owise, you can just simply re-invest the dividend income if you had no immediate need for it. Invest in REITs with a good sponser, etc Capitaland & Mapletree, circa 4-5% dividend yield. There's plenty of information on these kind of reits in Seedly, take your time to read through. All e best!

Technical Analysis

Value Investing

Investments

Wilson Nid A Break
Wilson Nid A Break
Level 4. Prodigy
Answered on 07 Apr 2019
Personally, I feel that there's no true "technical investing", only technical trading. The only aim is to profit in the shortest frame as possible via price swings/fluctuations without consideration to the company's long-term fundamentals, dividend payouts, quality of management etc. You utilize the technical tools thats available to you & ascertain a target (buy/sell) price to enter & a subsequent target (sell/buy) price to exit the position within a set timeframe, could be days/weeks but rarely into months/years. One is making a trade order on the entire basis on how stock price behave in that single time frame. But whether technical investing is truly riskier on the practical application really depends on the individual trader, ability to stay discipline such as cutting loss when things go awry, amount of leverage used, eyes staying glued to the screen all times to be able to made a quick decision etc. However, as a individual who is "buy & hold" long-term fundamental investor, I do find technical analysis (albeit in much simpler forms) do have its merits when I made a decision to buy-in aftering doing my fundamental analysis. I would looked at things such as bid/ask volumes, recent price trends, price support levels to determine the appropriate price range to enter. Although quite a handful of fundamental investors out there advocate that if you are buying for the long-term, then the entry price does not matter, I tend to mildy disagree. If by allocating some time & effort to do some basic technical analysis, couipled with a dose of patience, there's a good probability one can get a stock at a better starting dividend yield & able to buy more stocks using the same amount of money. That's akin to receiving a small bonus ,free-of-charge into one's pocket.
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