Rishi Ramchandani - Seedly
 
Rishi Ramchandani

Financial coach/founder of Cafe cash flow. I have a passion for personal finances and spent over a decade at BAML in HK & NY.

Rishi Ramchandani

Financial coach / Founder at Cafe cash flow

About

Financial coach/founder of Cafe cash flow. I have a passion for personal finances and spent over a decade at BAML in HK & NY.

Credentials

Financial coach / Founder at Cafe cash flow

Rishi Ramchandani

Financial coach / Founder at Cafe cash flow

  • Answers (6)
  • Questions (0)
  • Reviews (2)

Credit Card

Loans

Yes for sure, you can obtain your credit score for $6.42 at any singpost office https://www.creditbureau.com.sg/how-to-get-my-credit-report.html If you are going to a bank to enquire about a loan they might even give you your report for free. HSBC SG does it online it seems (i have not tried this) https://www.apps.asiapacific.hsbc.com/1/2/sgh2/hsbc-promotion-contact-me?WABFormEntryCommand=cmdinit Goodluck!

Investments

Retirement

ETF

Dividends

Hello! I assume you have explored REITS and other Div stocks and are specifically asking for ETF's so here goes - In SG you can use the SGX screener - https://www2.sgx.com/securities/etf-screener Sort by dividend yield. From this watch out for the expense ratio, for example the highest div paying etf is CFN @ 6.15 but it has an expense ratio of 2.71!!! Also keep an eye out for SGD vs USD, assuming you want SGD ETFs. Volume is another thing to look out for, CFN didnt trade today... O9P is a 'good' one, its essentially HYG for Asia, do note its in USD - "• Diversified exposure to high yield bonds issued by governments and corporates in Asia ex Japan region • USD denominated high yield bond exposure • For investors seeking potential higher income" There are also so REIT etfs in there which are not bad. This screener is a good starting point! Hope this helps!

CPF

Career

Definatly needs to be determined when you sign your contract. I worked in HK, US and now SG and at the highest level - it depends on the country, then the next level it depends on the company. Also - are you PR/Citizen in SG? If you are located in HK but employed in SG for example - You should only be liable to pay MPF (HK version of CPF) and not CPF. You should never be contributing towards two pensions, then your company is doing something wrong. But if they are matching both then maybe dont complain!

Investments

ETF

If it is for long term and you have these feelings then I would just pay the fees and store it in a CDP. I personally don't worry about it because in the bank end they are all interlinked - IB uses state street for example and so do a lot of asset managers and even banks so if state street went down, everything is doomed! Also an informative article by Seedly - https://blog.seedly.sg/cdp-vs-custodian-account/

StashAway

Investments

CPF SA

Stocks Discussion

Hello First of all - Congrats on the savings! Nice job I'd start by asking what are your goals with this investment? Is it for short term, is it for retirment, is it simply to be invested and grow your money? Looks like you already have some in your CPF SA which is for retirement and a low risk investment. Given your young age I would consider most if not all to be in equities and the rest in fixed income or money market funds, a 70/30 split. Or if you have a higher risk tolerance then 100% equities, especially considering you already have some in your SA account. In the Equities you can put it in lower risk investments such as Index ETFs or even theme ETFs, so whilst its all in equities, its diverified within a basket of stocks. My whole belief is to start making your money work for you! Create a split between dividend stocks, index etfs and growth stocks. And the money you have sitting in cash - consider something like Stashaway Simple - where you are atleast getting 1.9% and can pull it out anytime! Goodluck! Feel free to ask any more questions!

Investments

Insurance

Endowment Policies

Savings

Stocks Discussion

Since you are a beginner, my question to you is - what do you consider low risk? Are you not willing to lose anything at all? Or are you ok to see your investment fluctuate with the markets. Also, what time span are you looking to leave this investment in? If you are not willing to lose anything at all then just look at high interest savings accounts, money funds, fixed deposits etc. where you will likely get under 2% return. Maybe fixed income like gov bonds but even that has 'risk'. If this is a long term investment and by low risk you are willing to see your investment move up and down with the markets then consider low fee index ETF's. But again, this all depends on YOUR definition of LOW RISK. I phrase it this way as typically when someone is new to investments, their definition of 'low risk' compared to a savy investor is different, so just making sure!
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