Luke Ho
Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners
265 upvotes received
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A financial services consultant. Zero filter, only hard truth.
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Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners
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  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 1d ago
    Depends how you define strategy. You really don't need much, to be honest. 1) Buy an investment thats within your comfort level. 2) Hold onto it for an extremely long period of time regardless of what happens to it in the short term. 3) Sell it at a higher price than you bought it for, ideally at least higher than inflation rate or safer instruments.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 1d ago
    The expense ratio is what it costs the company to operate a mutual fund or ETF. Typically, because mutual funds are more active (they trade more or use derivatives), their expense ratios are higher since those actions cost money. ETFs tend to be cheaper because they only need mimic securities, which is much cheaper. A good expense ratio for a mutual fund really depends on the asset. There are some basic global standards: 0.4 - 0.7 ETFs 0.7 - 0.9% Index Funds 1.25% - 1.5% Mutual Funds (Efficient Equities) 0.75% - 1.1% Mutual Funds (Bonds) Investopedia Etc etc. Obviously, lower funds are generally useful in creating alpha and generating more net return, but the context is important. Emerging funds for example, typically can go as high as 1.75%, 2% but you get plenty more bang for your buck, at least historically when compared to Global or US equities which you can get cheaply. So it really depends more on fund performance. Personally, I have no problem paying more for higher risk and higher return, which is why my customized portfolios for clients will do better in the long term. But not everyone is suitable for such risks, since expense is also a risk. If you're comfortable, you can always reach out to me to have a chat about it. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    Really low returns, that's what.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    Plenty of good can come out of this. America loses billions of dollars to illegal immigration every year. Now imagine even a fraction of that money focused on the economy, and then a fraction of that ending up in your pocket (since we almost always inevitably use US currency or invest in some US Equities, which affect the global market, and then...)...
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    The best option by a large margin would probably be p2p lending sites like SeedIn or CoAssets. I'm actually really surprised no one brought it up, since 100% capital preservation is not necessary. SeedIn currently has zero defaults over the last 6 years and depending on the bond that you choose on a first come first serve basis, you can yield 5 - 17% net of fees. The bonds are flexible and can last anywhere between 6 months to two years, again entirely based on your choice and preference. You can nudge me if you'd like a referral code for 'priority' queue. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    Whichever age is earlier.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    I think its the opposite really, unless you think Japan's just gonna stand around twiddling their thumbs and feeling sorry for themselves. Hate to be a Buffett cliche, but be greedy when others are fearful and vice versa. If you'd like to consider a market beating fund from Japan for diversification, do let me know. Current yield despite last year's 16% drop is still 9%+ annualized net of fees. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2d ago
    Not an IFA. I'd like to look at your Lifeready policy for a potential overlap - but needs specific details on the amounts. Generally I rarely put ECI and CI on the same policy. Your GE whole life plan should complement your LifeReady and vice versa. Like Hariz said, the total amount (10x, 5x) is more important. I'm big on saving you more money in the event there's an overlap so that said premiums can be channeled towards making you more money - I'm sure you agree that'd be far more favorable than being confused. You can drop me a message at https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    It took slightly under a year. I'm 26 years old. And it wasn't worth it. This was a goal I pursued because I had a lot to prove. I had no gifts or full time job experience. I was repeatedly told I was not good enough to be a teacher, despite 8 years of being in Education. I would redo a lot of it. I work as a Financial Consultant. The fact I made that much money might fulfill some stereotypes, but I don't flex my money since it's mostly invested now. I was working about 12 - 14 hours a day for about 90 - 100 hours a week. I would do this anywhere from 3 weeks to a month half before crashing. I opened up some side gigs. Tuition, teaching dance, business consultancy. I didn't have connections, sales skills or financial background, so I had to work very very hard to do well in my line. Even then, it was considered pretty bad, which is why I had to do all those side gigs in the first place. After 12kg gain, falling sick 9 times that year and saving scraps and living off vouchers at one point, I made it. -- What would I do differently...pretty much everything. Be more efficient: To quicken the process, I would ask futurre me how to efficiently do certain things. To avoid reading things that were unnecessary, to avoid pressing clients who didnt need or want to be pressed, to practice more instead of bull-charging into business without a solid business plan... Better my craft: I would become better at my craft, which I am now (and continuing to be so I dont become complacent) and value my time more. Some things were wasted because I didn't better my craft, but spent time trying to get people to try it on rather than working on myself. Value myself and my time: Once people today see I value my time, they give me less crap. And more opportunities open up once you close some doors. So I'm not as stressed as before, and I also make more money. Rest more: Because compromising your health and lifespan for wealth can be really stupid. If I had rested 2 hours more and worked 2 hours less, I'd probably have made more money instead of stressing, making poor pitches, being tired and depressed at many points... Invest earlier: Everyone says this. But this was 2017. It means a LOT. Ask for help: Not ask for money or plead for people to buy stuff from you, but...I needed to ask for help more. I thought it would look bad, but I should have cared more about delivering better results than appearing like I had good results. That's the mistake many financial planners and entrepreneurs and rich people make today. Sometimes I would work so hard that I would start crying for no reason. It would be very alarming and my subconscious was clearly trying to tell me something. I hope that helps you. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho
    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    160 Answers, 265 Upvotes
    Answered 2w ago
    It's possible since I'm aiming for about 70 - 72k dividend payouts myself for my own retirement. You'd need between 700k - 900k to be comfortable and maybe less if you're want it urgently. I also offer such instruments that do exactly what you want - you can have monthly income sent directly to your bank, automatically rebalanced and if you're not using the payout you can reinvest it. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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