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Luke Ho

A financial services consultant. Zero filter, only hard truth.

Luke Ho

Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners

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A financial services consultant. Zero filter, only hard truth.

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Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners

Luke Ho

Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners

  • Answers (285)
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Investments

ETF

STI ETF

Stocks Discussion

What are the differences between all these funds- Nikko AM Shenton Singapore dividend equity fund, Nikko AM STI ETF, Schroder Asian growth fund; and have any of you bought them?
The components for all that you've mentioned are slightly different (the Singapore one has slightly differnent components from the STI ETF. For the Manulife program one, its not too difficult to comment on but for the msot part, most growth funds focus on growth while dividend funds focus on giving out dividends. That does not mean that growth funds are incapable of giving out dividends or that dividend funds cannot grow, it just means the objective is generally there (and the name is catchy). Id really advise you to just consult your consultant or a 2nd opinion with an investment specialist if you'te feeling insecure about your portfolio. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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Value Investing

Investments

Stocks Discussion

Sales/maturities of investments?
Well yes. In fact, most people would ask the opposite - they would ask why the negative cash used for investing activities is justified by the company or community as a positive thing for you in the long run. THis article actually denotes that to some degree using banks as an example: https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/post/net-interest-income-how-i-avoid-the-largest-fees-of-all This is a technique utilized by most successful financial institutions and businesses, which incidentally you can actually mimic to some degree with your own investments and financial advisors if they can help you manage the risk of doing so. If you're an individual shareholder, you just want to roughly know what they will do once the investment matures (what they will do with the money). Who knows, you might get a larger dividend later. :) (and then you'd have to debate whether thats a good or bad thing depending on the company. Ugh)
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Investments

Stocks Discussion

Hi all, could you please give me some criticism or feedback on my investment plan?
You're pretty aggressive, which is always fun to comment on. You have REITs and the stocks part is a little vague so its hard to comment on that, but generally 80 - 10 - 10 with no bonds. My criticism would be that you didn't state the duration of how long you want this portfolio to run, the volatility you expect from it (how much does 10% of bullion balance it out? I've done all weather portfolios, so I know for a fact that the answer is not much to the point you may as well not have it at all). If I'm accumulating for a purpose like retirement I'd rather have stocks or funds that have ties to the economy because if you chose stocks like Royal Carribean (cruise) you're pretty much screwed. And if you were already good at stock selection, why not invest in REITs on your own? No need to compromise the returns for potentially unnecessary diversification if you really felt you can pick your own stocks. (hows that for crticism?)
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Investments

Unit Trust

How do I go about selecting UTs to invest and what are the areas I should look out for?
Hi Anonymous, I happened to have chanced upon this while seeing someone responding to one of my answers from years ago. It's natural to be apprehensive as most Unit Trusts are actively managed and by extension, charge a much heftier fee, which certainly affects investment returns. The problem with your current sources on many books and articles is that they typically come back to the same piece of research, which is SPIVA - or the Standard and Poor Indices and Active. This is a comparison to show funds that underperform compared to indices. There are many viable criticisms for this line of study, but much of it was covered briefly by Samuel below. Most of the categories are not only effiicient-market based, but they are also wrongly compared: as this article will highlight - where if you feel MOST actively managed funds underperform their benchmarks: ALL passive investing underperforms their benchmarks. All. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/amp/every-single-passive-fund-manager-underperform-reason For the most part, as an investment specialist I'd love to help you out if you're still looking for opportunities, especially during this time of Covid where the market is much lower from its previous highs. Luke https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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Stocks Discussion

Investments

Savings

Looking at how stocks have plummeted, it seems like I've thrown years of retirement planning away. Any words of advice?
I think the emphasis is on seems. Back in the day when people kept screaming recession like bloody murder, I did quite a bit of research in 2018 and produced this. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/post/why-you-should-invest-aggressively-now-and-how-you-still-can-have-peace-of-mind Basically it outlines how quickly markets rebound, which is actually why people who time the market fail - they sell low and then buy in when its high, since they can't predict bull markets. If you've taken a concentrated equity approach like myself, you'd have seen pretty large losses, but this was all part of the risk you were supposed to take. If your retirement planning is truly in danger, you should really speak to a consultant as to what kind of damage control you can do and understand what went wrong with your own planning. It's not uncommon to have people become bigger risk takers magically when things are going well. Or in the case of right now, you see countless people adjust their 'risk' on Stashaway when stocks are 'low'. If you behave in a herd you will end up like a herd. Herds aren't rich. I advice you to stay invested ,keep investing and look at the long term. Time heals your wounds. Money Maverick https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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Lifestyle

Investments

Savings

How should I spend the winning of Toto?
Luke Ho
Luke Ho
Level 7. Grand Master
Answered on 28 Feb 2020
Congratulations, honestly - on a dream come true. After you service your debts and handle your basic finances, you can have serious Financial Freedom. I'm sure you've seen endless articles about it, if you've been here for a long time. Since everyone has offered something fairly generic except for Gabriel - I'd suggest that you focus on creating that stream of income and slowly do Financial Planning for how the money can be both a) Sustainable - using it as and when you need, but also for enjoyment b) Meaningful - in relation to the things you want to accomplish and how to consider carefully for them. You don't want to be tricked into doing something inefficient, so I would suggest you speak to an Investment Specialist on that kind of matter. You can always reach me here if you'd like to talk. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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Insurance

Term Life Insurance

Whole Life Insurance

Investments

Is it true that insurance agents don’t want you to buy term so that they can sell more life policies for more commission?
You ask them. They are actually obligated to reveal to you the specifics of their commissions. In my experience, most of my term policies command a higher commission percentage than whole life, but whole life policies are usually more expensive. Sometimes you need a more expensive policy because it makes a lot of sense. Other times, you don't. And you have to keep in mind that whole life policies have so many useful features and variants that not 'investing the rest' is a very ineffiient move, let alone having any actual investment ability or experience. I would suggest you use this as a starting point. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/post/how-to-choose-your-insurance-plan-and-why-you-chose-it And remember - an insurance agent isn't generalized. They're human like you. Have a conversation with them and if you don't like the conversation, walk away. If you do, stick around and see how you can get a win- win.
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Investments

Savings

Retirement

Any tips for me to retire by 60 with $1,000,000 by saving $1,000 each month?
Here's an idea, since Clarence already pointed out the very conservative approach you can do. I wrote this article for this kind of scenario. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/post/why-you-should-invest-aggressively-now-and-how-you-still-can-have-peace-of-mind Take an aggressive approach. Statistically, any portfolio that has a 20 year horizon or above, with Dollar-Cost-Averaging like yours ($1000/mth or $12000 a year) can afford to go 100% equities. You have a couple of options (non-inflation adjusted) 1) Take riskier, concentrated positions and go for 13% or higher annualized - you'll have about $1mil in less than 20 years. 2) Take a diversified global portfolio option but with 100% equities. With rebalancing that I offer on my end, you could try for a decent 8% net of fees easily. So again, you could get $1mil in about 20 years, letting it roll for 7 more years for considerable less risk. I would recommend this option if you don't have a lot of investment experience. In any case, you can see from both cases that you can retire well before 60. To cope with inflation, we can turn your lump sum into a variable annuity - meaning that we'll strategically calculate how much money should be withdrawn along with your dividend to match inflation and you'll be dead before the entire sum is used up. We'll also adjust your portfolio as you get older to make this end result more favorable. Go big, since you're already starting so young and investing an amount that's pretty high for your age. For illustration, here's a successful recipient of example number 1 - his capital was $12,000 in December 2018, and it's this much now. ! Do feel free to contact me if you'd like help, as I'm an investment specialist. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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StashAway

Robo-Advisors

Investments

SeedlyTV S1E04

Is Stashaway a good app to invest in for beginners? Am gonna start soon and was wondering if it's the right choice?
There's a ton of other options, because if you're looking at long term results across a portfolio that is going for 20 years or longer, many things beat Stashaway. The SNP500 alone. QQQ Index. Emerging Market Index. Or if you wanted significantly higher alpha, active funds that outperform the strongest index in the world by 4 percentage points net of fees. ! Some people would take two approaches to Robos 1) Trading regularly 2) 5 - 10 year approach, which is optimal because you get a very sweet risk-adjusted return. At some point in 2018, it's risk-adjusted return was so much better that I had to refer a client to it compared to my own product. So I don't look down on it, but I'm doubtful whether it's the best instrument for your situation. If you insist on looking at Robos or ETFs that it comes with, I'd still go with Stash compared to the SNP500 immediately - because I've written extensively on it and you can see that it has drops as high as 89%. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/post/why-you-should-invest-aggressively-now-and-how-you-still-can-have-peace-of-mind Yes. I'm not kidding. So it can be a bit hard for a newbie to stomach if it happens to you immediately, compared to the asset allocation that Stash will do for you. I also think that Stashaway, although it may not be as fee friendly as say, Autowealth - is better. The CIO just seems like quite a visionary. But please, don't take any of this as formal advice. Do get it from a professional. That's what it always boils down to anyway - because no one who's giving you advice here will take responsibility for what happens except a professional. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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Investments

Stocks Discussion

How do you balance DCA vs time in the market? Let's say I have 30k now ready to be invested?
Overwhelmingly, you don't balance it. DCA works in very short periods. Even though the annualized yield was smaller on paper, the absolute return was higher. So if your time horizon is long (say, 20 years), you should invest it entirely regardless of the market cycle. There is an analysis here: https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/post/how-my-5-2-investment-completely-destroyed-another-s-6-5-by-almost-300-000, Which is based on white paper studies from Vanguard. Money Maverick https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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