Luke Ho
Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners
212 upvotes received
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A financial services consultant. Zero filter, only hard truth.
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Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners
  • Answers (119)

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  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Kick-Ass Financial Services Consultant at Trillion Financial Planners
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    You can start to invest long term to build up a financial fallback in the event of extreme emergency/disease. Aside from them, you should also consider three things: 1) GIO plans - because they will still provide you additional benefits regardless of your c ondition, and may be better for preservation of your capital. 2) Pre-existing insurance plans - Such as AIA Diabetes and PruTerm which may cover you despite your preexisting condition. 3) Topping up your Medisave - because it will be your primary fallback and compounds at a guaranteed rate. You can always nudge me if you would like help on these matters. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    Unlike the fella who answered below, ECI is undoubtedly the future. It's much more a statement of fact than it is an opinion, and the movement that the economy and government is taking towards it is proof of it. I'm especially convinced of this from my in-depth research recently, which I posted as an article: https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/posts/6-critical-illnesses-you-zero-coverage-part-one Many late stage CIs are irreversible and random, while Early claims give you the opportunity to expedite treatments or have access to specialized ones so that you can get your life back on track, unlike late stages which require long term care. As an FA who offers multiple companies, I've done a comparison table of whole life+early ci across the board. Each has its pros and cons and have benefits depending on your profile. Prices can also defer from age, especially between the early 40s group and the late 20s group. The price also depends on what kind of multiplier you want. A $50,000 x 3 is cheaper than a $75,000 x 2, but you'll have substantially less of a claim after 70 as well as lower cash values, which can be pretty important once you see the difference in numbers. Do drop me a PM and we can talk about this properly. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    Plenty. Even Conservation Capital, which most of the community knows pretty well by now for buying and selling half-done Endowment plans, is not MAS regulated. There is a large group of business entities that do portfolio management which are BOTH not MAS-licensed AND not on the MAS Investor list. So I can't really specify what kind of circumstances, since there's many reasons for them not and being on the MAS Investor Alert list.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    I'm not sure how you got such a ridiculously high housing loan to begin with. The highest one anyone should settle for is the HDB one 2.6%. And trust me, every 0.1% counts. The first thing I would do for you is negotiate and refinance a much lower rate, like 2% or less. It ultimately depends on your investing skill and discipline. Especially discipline, since investing for 30 years is not something every likes. But its very easy to beat 3%. So if you ask me personally, I would absolutely just invest the $100k. The interest may look high by not paying it off early but it would be nothing compared to compounding $100k for 30 years. With that kind of time horizon, I could also take a more aggressive position and make double digits annualized. In 30 years, your 100k at a 10% compounded rate - which is VERY doable...you'd have 1.745 million dollars. This would be on the basis that I don't intend to sell my house in the future. I can still take out a second mortgage on it later for even more income. Do let me know if I can help you further by messaging me below. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    It really depends on what kind of aim you had with the AIA plan. You have to get it out of your head that being an ILP does not merit it being a poor investment. It is not difficult for a ILP fund to beat the common range of instruments out there such as the STI ETF, a Robo Advisor or even the SNP500. You have to know what the AIA Pro Achiever is invested in, what kind of return you can expect, WHY you can expect that kind of return, etc. If that hasn't been clear to you yet, go back to your FA because thats his job. And if you need a new one, drop me a message. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54 I've written on the subject and have quite a decent amount of experience beating common funds. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/posts/investment-link-insurance-good-bad-misconceptions
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    Some common features are 1) Low cost - which is the primary reason people buy ETFs instead of funds. There can be a variety of hidden fees for ETFs as well, since they're designed for trading - so try not to be tempted into giving up your postion on a regular basis. Watch out for other fees such as platform fees, management fees and taxes. 2) Liquidity - Desirable feature for most, impractical for most as well. Investments should be long term. But it is certainly desirable. Outside of crashes or corrections, ETFs are often more liquid than Unit Trusts except during periods where no one is willing to purchase them during exceptionally poor times. 3) Diversification - because otherwise you can just buy some stocks. One of the reasons why I think the STI ETF is basically a hunk of junk about 60% financials https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/posts/sti-etf-not-good-beginners. Prices are much lower this year than last year though, so you might get some value in the short term. Make sure your ETF spans across all the sectors well. 4) Yield - historical or otherwise. It's why people would opt to buy outside of Singapore as well, since overseas yields, both US and Emerging - have much better historical yields than Singapore. For efficient markets like the US - which is basically a reference to the fact that the majority of information about them is out there which makes it near impossible for a fund manager to outperform that market consistently - ETFs make more sense. Check your market and instrument before choosing an ETF as well. You can always read my blog to learn more about investing in general. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    Almost every company offers this. As an FA who offers multiple companies, I've done a comparison table of whole life+early ci across the board. Each has its pros and cons and have benefits depending on your profile. Prices can also defer from age, especially between the early 40s group and the late 20s group. The price also depends on what kind of multiplier you want. A $50,000 x 3 is cheaper than a $75,000 x 2, but you'll have substantially less of a claim after 70 as well as lower cash values, which can be pretty important once you see the difference in numbers. Do drop me a PM and we can talk about this properly. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    Your Pulsar allocation is heavily concentrated and less diversified - as it should be, since you need to make a lot in order to overcome the fees. Its best not to think of it as anything other than a 20 year long plan, even if you can afford to pay less than that. For crypto, you may want to keep more of the currency that has been declared 'finite' while opting out of most of the other currencies. The market bubble for most of them has popped - and while we can both agree that blockchain has a future, there wont be one for the majority of currencies.
  • Asked by Bing Xian

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    ECI is definitely the future. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/posts/prioritise-early-critical-illness-insurance-life-insurance Especially because we live in such an advanced country with early detection and treatments. I purchased a substantial amount of ECI. ECI is actually for multiple purposes - expedited treatments/surgeries or specialized treatments, as well as income replacement, a much wider range of coverage, etc. In depth study into the CIs will show you that late stage cases are often irreversible - while ECI is not, and you should beat the crap out of it with a huge chunk of money and reimbursed medical bills so you never experience it again. You can purchase a policy strategically such that if you claim, you'll make money and if you don't claim you'll make money anyway. Every policy is designed to increase your net worth. If you have any questions about ECI, you can always drop me a message directly. I'd be happy to answer them. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Luke Ho, Money Maverick at Money Maverick
    119 Answers, 212 Upvotes
    Answered 1w ago
    ECI is definitely the future. https://www.moneymaverickofficial.com/posts/prioritise-early-critical-illness-insurance-life-insurance Especially because we live in such an advanced country with early detection and treatments. I purchased a substantial amount of ECI. ECI is actually for multiple purposes - expedited treatments/surgeries or specialized treatments, as well as income replacement, a much wider range of coverage, etc. In depth study into the CIs will show you that late stage cases are often irreversible - while ECI is not, and you should beat the crap out of it with a huge chunk of money and reimbursed medical bills so you never experience it again. If you have any questions about ECI, you can always drop me a message directly. I'd be happy to answer them. https://www.facebook.com/luke.ho.54
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