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Lim Jin Han

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Lim Jin Han

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Lim Jin Han

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Property

Lim Jin Han
Lim Jin Han
Level 3. Wonderkid
Updated on 07 Jun 2019
I think I would. I never used to believe in Feng Shui, but I've come to believe more in it this last few years. Although I haven't gotten my first property yet, a number of my friends have consulted with The Healing Xanadu before and gave good reviews about them. Am thinking of engaging their services when I buy my first home. https://thehealingxanadu.com/product/feng-shui/

Career

Lim Jin Han
Lim Jin Han
Level 3. Wonderkid
Updated on 04 Nov 2018
I started my career as a freelancer, took up some full-time positions in between and returned to life as a freelancer. In almost every situation, my income as a freelancer was higher. But the truth is, I never chose life as a freelancer for the money (although that was a bonus). I decided to be a freelancer for the freedom. The danger is, once you're used to that life, it becomes a little difficult to return to a full-time job because even though I eventually got a full-time offer that pays me over 2 times my freelance income, I turned it down because it wasn't what I wanted to do and exchanging my freedom on top of that is just not worth it for me. With 2-3 times higher income, you can easily cover your own medical and insurance. Employer CPF for a $6,000 salary is only about $1,000 which is more than adequately taken care of in your $12,000-18,000 freelance income. You can continue to contribute that amount to your CPF if you choose to. If you're worried the freelance work may just end in 6-9 months, perhaps some of the things you can consider are: 1) is the freelance gig related to what you eventually want to do or 2) is it a stepping stone to what your eventual goal is If the above is the case, I find that it places you in a better stead. Even if you decide to return to full-time positions later, not only would the freelance work benefit you financially in the short-term, it also places you in a better position to negotiate for better salary given the experience it offers. But do note that, you'll be in a position to negotiate for better salary than what the companies want to offer and not necessarily than what you're getting as a freelancer. I reckon you're good at what you do since someone is willing to pay you that amount for your services. Besides, if you're paid 3 times your current salary, a 9-month gig would mean you're getting 2 years worth your current salary. At 28 years old, after the 9-month gig, you're still under 30 (yet you have pocketed an amount that you would be getting if you continue work till 30 at your current job). And being under 30 means you're still very marketable. In my opinion, even if it takes you 1 year to find the next job, you're still financially ahead than if you were to stay in the current position. However, if it is not what you see yourself doing in the long run or is unrelated to whatever you are or will be doing, are you willing to take the risk to see how this gig pans out? Ultimately, look at what you value more in life and make decision based on that and not just the monetary aspect.

Critical Illness (CI)

Salary

Bank Account

Insurance

Lim Jin Han
Lim Jin Han
Level 3. Wonderkid
Updated on 01 Nov 2018
If you need the financial assistance, do talk with a medical social worker. Whether you qualify or not depends on a lot of factors but there's no harm seeking it. Just because your house is worth $500,000 doesn't mean you don't qualify for financial assistance. And no, they won't make you sell it especially if you're living in it. I'm not sure what your CI is, but hospitals like the National Cancer Center usually have medical social workers there. Just tell the staff you need to speak with a medical social worker and they will tell you what to do. The social worker will also share with you the various assistances available. There are several types of financial assistances available, many of which depend a lot on your household income and expenses. The most common of which that is applicable to you would be something like Medifund, which is an endowment fund set up by the Government to help Singaporeans who have difficulty paying for their subsidised medical expenses even after insurance and Medisave. There could be other assistances available depending on what CI you have. For example, the cancer association gives a one-time lump sum for cancer patients: $500 if you have the orange CHAS card and $1000 for the blue CHAS card. For the CHAS card, since you have income, the Annual Value (AV) of your home will not be taken into consideration. The requirement is as follows: - For households with income, the household monthly income per person must be $1,800 and below. - For households with no income, the Annual Value (AV) of home must be $21,000 and below. Also, "household monthly income per person" refers to the total gross household monthly income divided by total number of family members living together. So, if you live with one parent and you're the only person working making $2500 a month, your monthly household income per person is $1250 and you qualify for the CHAS card. If you qualify, means everyone living in your household qualifies, so make sure to apply for every member in the household by filling in all their names in the application form. In conclusion, request to speak with a medical social worker at the hospital you're at to get all the financial assistance information you need. If you don't request, they won't ask you. Regardless of whether you qualify for all or any of it, you have nothing to lose by speaking with the medical social worker. Wish you the best in your recovery.

Savings

Family

Lim Jin Han
Lim Jin Han
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 31 Oct 2018
Once a year, give your children a big angpow (for example, $100 during CNY or whichever festival applicable to you). Tell them this $100 will be the money for them to buy whatever they want for the whole year. If they finish it, they will not get anymore until the following year. But you don't have to hand them the money. Just let them know if there is something they want, they just let you know and you will take it out of their $100. Each time they want something, let them know it will come out of their $100 and ask if they really want it. If they do, buy it for them and let them know how much of their $100 remains (for example, keep track on a paper in simple understandable manner and stick it on the fridge). If they use it up too fast, they will gradually learn not to just buy everything they want. That way, they can gradually learn the concept of budgeting and controlling their expenses with real-life experience. It is fine if they use up their $100 within a few months in the first year as they have years to pick up the habit. I believe this works particularly well with siblings because if one of them (for example, the younger child when he starts receiving his $100) uses up their fund early in the year and see other siblings still have funds to use, they would see how the other siblings are budgeting their money and learn from there. I'm not married nor do I have kids, but among all the methods I've heard so far, this is my favourite and I intend to apply them when I have children of my own. It is of course important for the parent to not give in to the child when they whine after using up all their funds for the year.

Retirement

Savings

Career

Lim Jin Han
Lim Jin Han
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 18 Oct 2018
I was in a similar position a few years ago. Was making about $30,000+ a year working 3 days a week when my former manager called to ask me to return to help him for $100,000+ a year (standard 5-day work week). I had thought to do it for 2 years, save enough and then go do something else. But eventually I turned it down, less because I was enjoying what I was doing, but more because there was something else I wanted to do and returning to the company wasn't it.

General

Lim Jin Han
Lim Jin Han
Level 3. Wonderkid
Answered on 17 Sep 2018
If you're not referring to any particular amount but just to start monetizing your videos, YouTube has laid out explicit requirements. Since the Logan Paul saga, new YouTubers now need at least 4,000 watched hours in the previous 12 months and 1,000 subscribers in order to monetize their videos.
Level 3. Wonderkid
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