Kenneth Fong
Level 4. Prodigy
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  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 1d ago
    Great question. To answer this properly, we need to understand what are common stocks, bonds, and preferred stocks. You’re probably going, “Why’re you talking about bonds, sia?” Relax. I got you, fam. TL;DR: Why Preferred Stocks = Low Liquidity? Preferred stocks - Have fixed dividends = free money - Are callable = capital 'guaranteed' in a way Investors more likely to hold than sell = low trading volume = low liquidity Haha. Sorry. About Common Stocks When investors talk about the 'stock' market, they're all referring to common stock because companies don't usually issue preferred stocks . Common stocks or stocks are the most common way for a company to raise money for its business. So when investors buy stocks, they’re buying common stocks. When investors buy stocks, they’re technically buying a stake in the company. And as 'owners', they have the right to vote during shareholder meetings and also receive dividends - if the company pays them. If the company does well and stock price increases, that’s when investors will see a capital gain . About Bonds I’m gonna side track a bit here. When raising money to expand its business or operations, a company can choose to issue stocks OR bonds. So why stocks instead of bonds? One word: Debt . A bond is where the company promises to pay a preset amount of interest annually for the life of the bond. Once the bond matures, the company also has to pay the bondholder the bond’s principal. You can also see why this would NOT be a good deal for companies because in the off chance that they go bankrupt , the company would have to sell their assets in order to pay off the bonds (aka debt). With stocks, a company has no such financial obligation. This is why stocks are a riskier asset for investors, but they also reward them accordingly. Especially if you can pick a company that grows exponentially without debt to slow it down. So What Are Preferred Stocks? Now that you understand what a stock and a bond is, it would make more sense to you if I explain that preferred stocks are more like bonds than a stock . Like bonds, preferred stocks: 1. Pay set dividends on a regular schedule eg. quarterly 2. Have a par value (a fixed price which the company can buy back the preferred stock from you) and are callable (more on this in a bit) 3. Are sensitive to interest rates The last point is particularly interesting as - like bonds - the value of preferred stocks rise when interest rates fall , and vice versa. The reason why the prices of issued bonds and preferred stock rise when interest rates fall is because these investments pay better than lower-yielding assets. Like bonds, the company STILL has to pay preferred shareholders the set dividend , even if the market price of the stock tanks. And should a company go bankrupt, they must sell their assets and pay, in this order: - Creditors & Bondholders - Preferred stock holders - Common stock holders You see why preferred stocks are called preferred now? Why Do Preferred Stocks Have Such Low Liquidity As Compared To Common Stock? We've established earlier that preferred stocks are a hybrid between bonds and common stocks. And like bonds, the investors who hold preferred stocks do so because of the set dividends (aka recurring income). In the US for example, institutional investors will buy and hold preferred stocks because IRS rules allow US companies that pay corporate income tax to exclude 70% of the dividend income they receive from their taxable income. But I digress. Another thing to note about preferred stock is that they are callable . Meaning the company has the right to buy back the shares at the par price . So as an investor, you’re always 'guaranteed' your capital - provided you bought the preferred stock at par price of course. To summarise, preferred stocks: - Have fixed dividends = free money - Are callable = capital 'guaranteed' in a way If you own a preferred stock, would you want to sell it? Or hold onto it till the price is right?
  • Asked by Jodi Lee

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 1d ago
    Will You Be Getting NCD 40% Next Year? Yes. As long as you don't make any claims under your insurance plan, you will attain NCD (No Claim Discount) 40% in the 4th year that you hold your car insurance. About NCD For those who aren't drivers, the NCD is a discount that reduces your car insurance premium for the following year. This is your insurer’s way of recognising and rewarding you for being a careful driver. Your NCD will keep increasing till a maximum of 50% upon the 5th year of you not making a claim on your insurance. After your 5th year, you'll continue enjoying 50% NCD as long as you don't drive like you're in "The Fast And Furious" franchise. I'm crying in the car rn. Shopping For Car Insurance About whether you should start shopping around for another car insurance now... think of it this way. Would you plan to buy toilet paper only when you need it? Or would you already start looking around NOW to see what's the best toilet paper available, or maybe even what's the best deal you can get in preparation for when you need toilet paper... Oh, and just in case you're wondering, your NCD is tagged to you . Not your car, or your insurer. So if you find a better deal or a plan with better benefits, and decide to switch insurers, your NCD moves along with you . However, this doesn't apply to NCD Protectors though. Those stay with whatever insurer you're with and cease to be in effect when you stop paying the premium, or switch insurers. If I were you, I would: 1. Shop around and check out current promos/deals 2. Talk to my current insurer now and see if they will match it or throw in some other sweetener If not, I'll switch. Unless your current insurer has fantastic customer service , then I'd recommend you stick with them - because submitting a claim to a non-responsive insurer is something I would only wish upon my greatest enemy - until you find a better plan or insurer. If you'd like to read more about car insurance, Seedly has a pretty good article for reference: https://blog.seedly.sg/best-car-insurance-singapore/
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 3d ago
    The definitions from Investopedia are great, but I'm sensing that you need more information, context, and preferably in simple-r English. First things first. What Is P2P Or Peer-To-Peer Lending? P2P lending platforms connect businesses or individuals looking to borrow, with people looking to invest. Borrowers can take advantage of lower rates, usually determined based on their credit scores or business plans. Obviously, the better your credit score or the more sound your business plan is, the lower the rates of interest you would have to pay on your loan because you're appraised as more likely to be able to pay back the loan. Meanwhile, investors (or 'lenders' if you will) with extra funds gain access to an attractive fixed income asset class that potentially yields better returns than other investment options like leaving it in the bank. What Are Default Rates? With the context being P2P lending, to 'default' on a loan is when a borrower fails to repay a loan. As a borrower , you want to keep the default rate on your profile as low as possible so that more potential investors are likely to invest in you. As an investor , you want to look for P2P platforms and borrowers with overall low default rates (read: lower chance of you losing your capital). But this is tricky... More on this in a bit. Simply put, default rates are an important statistical measure used by lenders to determine their exposure to risk and whether they would want to invest in your business or lend you money. All Of This Sounds Damn Iffy... Is The Government Regulating This? Why of course. It's Singapore leh. From 23 Feb 2019, all licensed securities-based crowdfunding (SCF) operators (for eg. Minterest, Funding Societies and etc) should "disclose information on interest rates and non-performing loan rates (read: default rates) in a consistent manner to enable investors to effectively compare different SCF offers and better understand the potential returns on their investments" (info from MAS Circular No. CMI 27/2018). This means that they have to state their overall default rates CLEARLY on their websites so that investors like yourself can make an informed decision. For your reference, this is the MAS way of defining what is a default (info from MAS Circular No. CMI 27/2018): What it means is that a defaulted loan is one which is 30 days past due OR in default based on contractual terms - whichever is earlier. So you see? Investopedia's definition DOESN'T apply to this context . Our government is damn kiasu. 270 days to them is... However, the displayed default rates on thse SCF operators' sites are not that straightforward either. While all the SCF operators have to display the MAS defined default rates, they sometimes have their own ways of calculating their overall default rates . Default Rates In The Real World Of P2P Lending Let's look at Funding Societies for example. If you go to their website and click on 'Statistics', then go to 'Loan' and click on 'Default Rate'. You'll see this: So you go, "Oh... Funding Societies' loan default rates have been dropping steadily since 2016 to 2019. Which means that the risk involved as an investor should be lower now, and it stands at 0.83%" Wait, that's NOT the full picture . If you scroll down and click on 'Performance of Singapore', you'll get tables which display the MAS way of calculating default rate: You're probably going, "Walao, this one more cheem. Why can't I just look at the 0.83% default rate of Q2 2019 in the earlier table and be done with it?" The fact is, even I don't know how Funding Societies calculated the "0.83% default rate" . It's not explained anywhere. I'm guessing the 0.83% is correct to Q2 2019, so in a way, it's even more updated than the figures in the table above which are probably correct as of 31 Dec 2018. We probably have to get in touch with their friendly customer support to better understand how did they get that figure though... But if we look at the MAS mandated figures, we can see that non-performing loan rates that are past 30 days (but fewer than 90 days) jumped from 0% in 2017 to 0.47% in 2018. Whereas loans past 90 days dropped from 0.08% in 2017 to 0% in 2018. Also, the way which Funding Societies define 'default' is slightly different: Now, let's look at Minterest. They do not have an overall default rate. But if you looked at the 'Statistics' tab on their site, you'll see: Looks familiar? However, unlike Funding Societies, Minterest doesn't give you the overall default rate of Q2 2019. The above information is only accurate as of 31 December 2018. So you still need to look at the opportunities available (after you sign up for an account as an investor, of course) for investment and determine if it's worth investing in or not. In summary: You really need to know what is the default rate you're working with before dabbling in P2P lending. Always ask questions when in doubt! Closing Thoughts There are many more aspects to P2P lending than just the default rate. If you'd like to read more, Seedly has a pretty good introduction article to P2P lending: https://blog.seedly.sg/p2p-comparison/
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 2w ago
    That's a good question! Shouldn't the government be reducing inflation to 0%? That way, we won't have to spend so much money on stuff what! Well... Yes, and unfortunately, No. I'm going to explain why inflation is important using something we're all familiar with: ice cream. TL;DR: Why Is Inflation Needed In Our Economy? Many economists, businessmen, and politicians believe that inflation, or the gradual increase of prices over time, helps keep businesses profitable and prevents consumers from simply waiting for lower prices before making purchases. On the other hand, rising prices also makes doing stuff like saving money harder. It causes individuals to engage in riskier strategies in order to increase or just to maintain their wealth. And as with anything that is remotely linked to the government, people are sure to suspect that inflation is just an excuse for some businesses or individuals to benefit at the expense of others. Defining Inflation Imagine that it's after school. And there are 10 kids who all love ice cream. The ice cream uncle standing outside school, only has 5 servings left in his cart. And he is selling them at $1 each. Each kid has $2 in hand and all of them want to have ice cream. The enterprising uncle realises that he can get more for his ice cream so he jacks up the price to $2. This $1 increase is a result of Demand Pull Inflation or excess demand of a scarce good. The next day, the uncle heads to the ice cream factory to get a restock of ice cream. The supplier informs him that milk prices have increased, so he is selling 10 blocks of ice cream at $100 instead of $80. The ice cream uncle knows that he gets 200 servings of ice cream from 10 blocks. And this $20 increase means that if he wants to make the same profit, he must now sell his ice cream at $1.10 instead of $1. This is a result of Supply Push Inflation , which is caused by a substantial increase in the cost of important goods or services where no suitable alternative is available. After all, he can't make ice cream out of water right? So bobian, he has to buy the product in order to make a living. Inflation In The Real World When everyone in an economy is expecting say... A 10% inflation, everyone adjusts their prices upwards by 10%. Suddenly your pint of milk costs $1.10 (from $1), your loaf of bread costs $3.30 (from $3), and your McSpicy meal costs... Well, you get the picture. This was EXACTLY what happened in the States during the 1970s where everyone expected double digit inflation due to high oil prices . In fact, people started factoring this inflationary expectation into their wages and prices of goods. Unfortunately, this expectation was allowed to develop and continued without significant economic growth which resulted in Stagflation . The result? Unemployment rates rose to an astronomical high and the US economy went into a recession. The world has learnt from this mistake though. So as a result, governments try to limit inflationary expectations by stating outright what the target inflation rate for the year is. This is why you'll notice that MAS makes a huge point every end of the year to announce what the target inflation rate for the next year will be . It'll usually be a sustainable and healthy level of inflation. Not high enough to turn your cash savings into "banana money" (read: currency used during the Japanese occupation which became worthless due to inflation). But high enough to create a sufficient buffer before deflation happens. Asset Bubbles: The Calm Before The Deflation Storm Asset Bubbles occur when Demand Push Inflation causes assets to become overvalued. Let's say all the cool kids at school think that having an ice cream after school is the trendy thing to do. The uncle decides to up the cool factor by branding his ice cream with a trademarked logo and prices his ice cream at $10 (remember that it only costs him $0.80 to make one before the supplier increased the price of ice cream). It's all the rage amongst the kids, and every one at school is either begging their parents to get them this "branded" ice cream or are saving up their pennies just to buy one. One day, the popular kids are sick of the uncle's ice cream and refuse to even pay cost price for the ice cream. The asset (ice cream) bubble has just burst, and what follows is deflation . Cue (ice) screams Sorry, couldn't help it. The Problem Of Deflation Remember the 10 kids who used to buy ice cream from the uncle? They all still have $2 to spend, but they're no longer interested in spending it on ice cream because it's not trendy anymore. Instead, they're buying Korean instant noodles because that's what all their K-Drama idols are eating. On Monday, the uncle sells his ice cream at $1. The next week, he drops it to $0.90 because the kids still aren't buying. A month in, he drops it to $0.80 out of desperation. Some of the kids start to wonder if they should have ice cream, because it's cheaper at $0.80 now. But they also can't help but wonder if it'll drop to $0.50 and that's when they can have 2 ice creams for the price of one . "Shiok! Deflation is great! I can buy 2 ice creams sia..." Gerald, one of the kids, exclaims. A couple of months later, 90% of ice cream uncles in Singapore can't afford to keep their carts because they can't pay for the ice cream distribution license. Gerald's dad, who also happens to be an ice cream uncle loses his job. And guess what? Gerald now has no pocket money for ice cream or Korean instant noodles... Closing Thoughts Inflation is a 'necessary evil' that helps keep the world economy functional. If you're concerned about inflation eating up the value of your dollar, Seedly has a great piece written on why investing can help you to overcome inflation. Do check it out.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 2w ago
    "We buy things we don't need, with money we don't have, to impress people we don't like." (Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club). I'm going to break my answer into two parts. 1) Does Carrying Or Owning A Branded Item Signal Status? Yes and no. Economists term this phenomenon of spending on luxury goods as "conspicuous consumption"'. Conspicuous consumers revel in the obvious brand recognition that comes with their purchases and will sport readily identifiable luxury goods as an indicator of their affluence . It's like a subtle flex to show everyone that they've "made it in life". We can see this phenomenon happening on Orchard Road where youths in their twenties are somehow walking around in sneakers that cost upwards of S$5,000 on the resale market. Fashionably dressed women carry questionably tiny, leather backpacks with huge brand logos emblazoned on them. You'll also be familiar with the loud screech of tires as a driver makes the 10m dash from one traffic light to another in a S$800,000 Ferrari. Which you can also easily do under the same amount of time... In an $80,000 Toyota Vios. The more recognisable the brand and the louder your possessions are, means the more likely that you're the shizz, right? Not exactly . For members of the general public who recognise what you're wearing, then sure. But they might not be thinking that you've made it . In fact, they might entertain thoughts like: - Sure bo... Is it fake? - Where does this person get the money? I bet he or she sells cocaine for a living. - This person confirm plus chop broke AF. Now in the eyes of the cognoscenti (people in the know), it'll be different. When it comes to luxury or branded goods, the more obvious they are, the less affluent or socially well connected the wearer or owner is likely to be . P.S. I'm looking at you, financial advisors, wealth managers, and insurance agents who wear Hermes belts. By the way, that's NOT part of their uniform or a gift for having graduated from (H)arvard. You too can own one for a mere S$2,000. The social elites are used to luxury in all its forms and will know that you're carrying a Bottega Venata without being told. See? No visible branding at all. Unless you recognise the pattern of the woven leather. I would even say that it's a social faux pas in their circles to be seen in an outfit that is informed by the aesthetics of Ed Hardy and Von Dutch. Remember this? So the truly wealthy elites will appreciate that you're listening to Vivaldi's Four Seasons in your car because they have the cultural knowledge to appreciate it. They will recognise that the painting on your wall is a Matisse without needing a 24K gold plaque next to it that screams where it's from. And they will appreciate that super soft £59.00 (S$104) plain white Sunspel T-shirt that you're lounging at home in, because they too, have 10 of the exact same T-shirts... Which they use as pyjamas. However, the general public might not be able to discern the difference . They will probably be able to recognise an Off-White T-shirt (costs S$500 on average) because it says "Off-White" on the back, front, sleeves, hem... You get the picture. Or know that a bag is Louis Vuitton only because it screams LV all over. And will probably not recognise its more discreet, and sometimes higher quality counterpart, which costs $500 more and looks like a plain, black bag. So, Does Carrying A Branded Item Signal Status? Yes, but you'll need an easily recognisable one in order to appeal to the general masses in order to maybe get their validation (y tho?). But seriously, they may or may not appreciate your 'taste' fully to understand why you spent $5,000 on a pair of shoes. And also, no, because that overtly branded luxury good will only signal your poor taste and lack of cultural knowledge to the social elites or those in-the-know. So why even bother? 2) What Do You Think Is Worth Spending Money On? I've established that splurging on luxury or branded goods is a relatively poor investment when it comes to showing off your wealth and status. Now, let's look at the commonly held theory that a reputable brand makes better quality items. Is that true? Well... Most of the time at least. Unless you can tell the difference between full-grain leather (read: not treated to remove imperfections), nubuck leather, or pleather (plastic that is made to look like leather). You're not going to be able to discern the actual value of a S$500 leather wallet, when in reality it probably costs: - S$100 to make it - S$200 to slap on a ridiculously huge logo, and a - S$200 mark up (for the lols) just to see if anyone is stupid enough to buy it What I'm trying to get at is this: Buying from a reputable brand does not necessarily mean that you're getting a high quality product . You still have to be discerning enough to tell the difference in the quality of materials used FIRST. And then have the discipline to ask yourself if it is really worth splurging S$1,000 on a handbag when a S$100 one would also serve the same purpose. Yes, I know the the more expensive one is probably nicer. But nicer for who? You? Or for the people who will see you carrying it? And hey, that additional S$800 that you didn't spend on the handbag could be better spent on: - Self-improvement (eg. coding classes to get that dream job you've always wanted) - Experiences (eg. a holiday with family and loved ones) - Saving for your retirement at 55 But that's not to say that we can't buy nice things for ourselves. Heck, who doesn't appreciate the finer things in life? We just need to remember to spend within our means and not reach for things outside of our financial lane.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 2w ago
    What you're feeling now is completely normal, especially since the job involves new skills which you currently do not have. But have you asked yourself: What're you losing out if you played it safe and passed on this job? An Alternative Way Of Looking At Things Considering that the company offered you the job - and I'm guessing probably without having to test your proficiency in the platforms or tech that you mentioned - I presume that your role is not as expertise heavy from the onset as you might think. Unless you somehow managed to get a job as a brain surgeon without a valid medical degree or experience, then you're REALLY out of your depth here and that company or hospital is obviously not going to do very well. But I digress. Even if the job does involve tech or platforms which you do not have any experience with, the company probably believes that with OJT (On the Job Training), you'll be able to pick it up . I'm also guessing that they're banking on your projected " confidence and competence " to tackle this role head-on and believe that you'll be able to handle it. Perhaps they saw something in your previous experience , where you had to take on something completely foreign and managed to do it well? Remember: we all have transferable skills , so give yourself a little credit here. In the worse case scenario where the company and you have mismatched expectations with regard to your capabilities. Then there're two ways to approach this. Option 1: Forget Everything And Run Admit that you're lacking the relevant skills and give up. Option 2: Face Everything And Rise Admit that you're lacking the relevant skills and show the company that hired you, that you're working on it, and you're on your way to becoming "Employee of the Month" for 3,576 consecutive months. Speaking from personal experience, I always pick Option 2 because it's way more rewarding. So What's The Next Step Moving Forward? 1) Go online and start reading everything you can about the platform or skills you need to familiarise yourself with. Join forums and online groups, and seek out subject matter experts to gain insights into what you're going to get yourself into. In this day and age, you can pretty much learn anything from YouTube, Reddit, Twitter etc. if you're resourceful enough. 2) If there's a dearth of knowledge online, start looking and going for classes or workshops to pick up the skills you need for your job. Better still, talk to your managers or hiring manager to see if there're company-identified courses for the job that you've been offered. If you're really lucky, they'll even pay for you to upgrade yourself. 3) Reach out to peers in the same industry or company and find out what are their go-to sources of info. Or simply to tap on their experience. Learn from their mistakes and level up faster. Attitude Always Counts Skills can always be picked up and platforms can be learnt. But a person with the right attitude and thirst for self-improvement is someone whom companies would kill to hire . Since you like the job enough to even interview for it, and the company's willing to take a chance on you, why not do the best you can and see how far you can grow as a person and as an employee? At the risk of sounding cliche, here's a quote from YouTuber Casey Neistat that really speaks to me when I face situations like yours, "The most dangerous thing you can do in life, is play it safe." If the company is willing to take a chance on you, don't you think you owe it to yourself to take a calculated leap of faith and show them what you can do?
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Updated 3w ago
    That's a pretty good question that almost everyone in Singapore has asked themselves, at some point in life. I suppose it boils down to 2 things: 1) Is it a want? Meaning a good-to-have kind of thing because you just want to avoid squeezing with everyone on the trains and buses on your commute to work. Or perhaps you want it as an "indicator" of wealth - a relatively poor one I might add. Then it's a liability . 2) Is it a need? Meaning you depend on it for your livelihood or for your day-today living. A good example would be salespeople who need the speed and convenience a car provides in order to meet clients. Or perhaps you need it to ferry your ailing parents or grandparents to regular checkups and etc. It's still a liability, but also a necessary asset - in some sense. The problem with owning a car, in Singapore especially, is that it's ridiculously expensive . Especially with the COE prices, road tax, car park fees, fuel, and etc. If you identify that a car is a want. Then you're better off using the 50% expenses/30% wealth building/20% savings rule to figure out how much you can responsibly allocate to this expense/liability AFTER you have contributed to your wealth building and savings fund. If your peers are driving around when all of you are earning something within the $2,000 to 3,000 range, this probably means that they are over-leveraged and are not saving enough for their future. If you identify that a car is a need, well... You should still use the above 50/30/20 rule but probably have to consider other equally important things like, does it make more sense to own a car vs. getting a private hire car/taxi to go about your daily life? In terms of: 1) Cost (taxi fees vs owning a car; arguably cheaper for the former but the convenience of a car means you don't have to wait or get cancelled on at the last minute by errant private hire drivers) 2) Time saved by driving vs. taking public transport (will you put it to good use eg. self improvement or exercise or answer 5 more work emails? or waste it on video games and Netflix...) And potentially more factors, depending on your circumstances and how heavily do you rely on having a set of wheels to get around. Also, being able to afford a car, is also different from whether you SHOULD buy a car. If you're interested to find out how much a car will cost per month, and how much you should realistically be earning if you want to buy a car, Seedly wrote a really good article about this: https://blog.seedly.sg/buy-car-how-much-should-be-earning/
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered 3w ago
    That's a good question, and a more common one than you might think. TL;DR: Making Sense of Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Blockchain is the technology that enables the existence of cryptocurrency, amongst many other things. Cryptocurrency is a medium of exchange, such as the SGD for example. Except that it's digital and uses sophisticated encryption techniques to govern the creation of individual monetary units as well as to verify the transfer of these units. The most well-known cryptocurrency is... You guessed it: Bitcoin. A Bit More About Blockchain A blockchain is, in the simplest of terms, a time-stamped series of immutable (unchangeable over time) record of data that is managed by a cluster of computers, that are not owned by any single entity. Each 'block' of data is secured and bound to each other using cryptographic principles aka the 'chain', hence the name blockchain. So... What's So Special About Blockchain? 1) Since a blockchain network is a shared and immutable ledger, the info is open to anyone and everyone to see. As a result, everyone who is involved is accountable for their actions, and there's really NO NEED FOR A CENTRAL AUTHORITY to govern it - which is also why MAS is having a field day trying to regulate cryptocurrency. 2) There is no transaction cost . There'll still be infrastructure costs involved though. So why is there no transaction cost? Simple. It's all data , there's no middle man or third party involved who needs to be paid. When one party makes a transaction, it initiates a process by creating a 'block' of data. This block is verified by thousands or even millions of computers in a network. Once the verified block is added to the 'chain' and stored on the network, it creates a unique record with a unique history. To falsify one record means falsifying millions of records across the millions of computers in the network - and that's virtually impossible. Why Should Companies Like Airbnb Be Afraid Of Blockchain? For Airbnb, we book rooms via an app or their website. They take a cut for "match-making" the host to a renter. And when we pay for the transaction, the credit card company takes a cut as well. With blockchain, we can save on credit card processing fees and even move the entire room/home booking process off Airbnb. Here's how. The two parties in the transaction are the host and the renter. The room is the 'block', which will be added to a room blockchain. Just as a monetary transaction on blockchain is unique, your booking of the room between the host and you (the renter) is also unique, verifiable, and cannot be falsified. Best of all, this process is free. Not only can blockchain transfer and store "money", but it can also replace all processes and business models which rely on charging a small fee for a transaction . If you want to read up more on cryptocurrency, Seedly has written a pretty good article on it: https://blog.seedly.sg/a-quick-singaporeans-guide-to-cryptocurrencies-and-factors-affecting-the-price/
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Kenneth Fong
    Kenneth Fong
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 19 Mar 2019
    A bit late to the game, but for anyone else looking for the best credit card when paying for a wedding banquet, you have a couple of options. First, ask if you can spread the credit card payment for your wedding expense over a few months. If you can, then: 1) For cashback/ rebates - UOB One Card Gives you up to 5% rebate on $2000 per month spent (min 5 purchases) but take note that you have to make payments for 3 months (based on qualifying quarters). If you need to make a lump sum payment eg. a huge deposit on your wedding banquet then: 1) For cashback/rebates - AMEX True Cashback Card You get 1.5% cashback on ALL purchases. Plus they usually have a welcome bonus of eg. 3% Cashback on up to a total of $5,000 spend in your first 6 months. 2) For miles - Citi Premier Miles Visa Card A new signup usually gives something like 30,000 miles if you fulfil a minimum spend ($7,500) within 3 months from date of card approval. I personally used this to finance our tickets for our honeymoon. Here's a good comparison done by Seedly: Save Money On Your Wedding Banquet: Credit Cards You Should be Using!