Eveline Lau
Level 4. Prodigy
‧ 41 upvotes received
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  • Asked by Leong Wen Fong

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 12 Feb 2019
    “You graduated liao ah?” Literally every relative asked me this after we shook hands. I bet they don‘t even know what I studied! P.S. really hope I can win this! I've never tried Hai Di Lao before....
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 08 Feb 2019
    I think you need to first be able to answer these 2 questions: 1. What is the main reason for you to go on working holiday? 2. What do you want to achieve in the future (career, finance/wealth, family)? Given the common sentiment of YOLO, more and more people are tempted by such "opportunities" (in parenthesis because it really depends on what would you like to get out of it) but you may also have realised that most people "choose to stay" and that is because most people have a stronger reason for the second question, which could be "I want to get promoted as fast as I can", "I want to earn as much money as I can to e.g. settle down", "I need to provide for my family", etc. It is not wrong or irresponsible to go on a working holiday but just remember, any decision you make on this (or anything) should be align with your goals. If your goal is to advance fast in your career, the answer should be clear that being away from your job is a no-go. Consider carefully what you want to get out of the working holiday and what value does it add to you. That aside, you should: a. Check your company's policy on sabbatical leave b. Understand whether you qualify for it In your case, you will be working. You should check whether your company allows you to work while on sabbatical (or would they consider it as moonlighting). Please also understand that just because you have the approval from the management to take sabbatical leave doesn't mean that your position in the company is reserved for you. In the event where they find you redundant to the team or they need the resource but you are not there, your company has every right to displace you (i.e. you are fired). Sabbatical leave is also granted to people with valid reason (e.g. health issues) and also to people whom the company values. This brings us back to Question 1 that you have to answer. If your reason is "not valid" (what you wish to get out of it does not add value), you don't get the approval and you've basically highlighted to your boss of your wavering commitment to the company. Likewise, if your performance at work is only average, they may not grant you with the approval. The worst case scenario is either they grant you the approval but find a replacement to displace you or they don't grant you the approval but make life difficult for you to make you leave on your own accord. You did not mention if this is your first job but assuming that you are at a relatively early stage of your career, be mindful that 1 year gap, even a 6 months gap, can be rather disadvantageous. If you don't mind lagging behind your peers in terms of career and wealth (Question 2) and you think it will add great value (Question 1), your path towards working holiday is clear :)
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 17 Jan 2019
    1. Gym membership. People tell me to just go running because it’s free but I don’t like to run; at the same time I want be fit. In a way, the money spent motivates me to attend classes every day so that I can inch towards my fitness goals. 2. Master’s degree It’s damn tiring to do a part-time degree on top of a full-time job. The paper qualification doesn’t add as much value to a Bachelor’s degree compared to a Bachelor’s degree‘s added value to a diploma. But the knowledge learned benefited me in other ways.
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 14 Jan 2019
    1. Keep/save the portion you planned as per resolution when you receive your pay every month. This way, you’ll never be missing your goal! 2. If you can have a separate banking account for spending only, that‘s even better. Keep it to the bare minimum w/o incurring any fall-below fee. This helps to inculcate the feeling of “I am poor”, which prevents you from spending money like pouring water. 3. If you can achieve Point 2, it means you have a separate Savings account. Do not apply for an ATM card for it or if you already have the ATM card, hide it away. Think of the money in there as “can see cannot touch”. 4. Cut down the number of credit cards you have. In the extreme case, use debit card only and link it to the separate Expenditure account only. 5. If temptation is your problem - stop window shopping, stop looking at newsletters from blog shops, delete your Lazada/Shopee/Qoo10 app from your phone. If you can’t see it, you can’t buy it. 6. Jot down your expenditure after every spend. You’ll have a good idea of how much you have spent and you’ll be shocked by it to want to spend more -- similar concept was applied by Kondo Marie and see how many people did she manage to change in this world!
  • Asked by Daniel Lee

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 09 Jan 2019
    I'm not well versed in investment so I'll focus on the small little things about saving, which people tend to overlook. Hope this can help somebody. 1. Save with high-interest saving accounts If you draw a regular monthly salary, there are many options - UOB One, DBS Multiplier, OCBC 360. Choose one that matches your spending pattern the most. Otherwise, you may also consider POSB Cashback Bonus. Salary is just one of the components, which would potentially make this account attractive to freelancers, housewives, people with income less than S$2,500 etc. 2. Pay yourself first Always set aside a portion that you intend to save when you get your pay (or allowance, if you're a student) before you do anything else. 3. Pay your credit card bills on time This is the kind of interest that you DO NOT want to have! 4. Skip ordering a drink to compliment your meal (or after meal) A can of drink doesn't cost much (
  • Asked by Daniel Lee

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 08 Jan 2019
    I used to have a big transparent plastic pig in green as my piggy bank, similar to this! It had googly eyes that moves when you shake the pig. It was the most basic piggy bank during those days but it’s also the best in my opinion, because I won’t need to break it and can be reused for years! When I was super duper young, my innocent goal for saving was to feed the pig till it’s full and heavy so that I can get a praise from my folks that I’ve done a good job! It was satisfying to empty the pig in the dining area and starting count them, in piles of $1, till I‘m surrounded a Ring of Coins! My folks did a great job in teaching me how to save as a young kid, even before I entered school (and in the process, how to count!) When I started primary school, the only thing I spent on was food during recess while the bookstore and snack store were sources of temptation. I used to save up money with the intention of wanting to buy an ice cream to eat with my friends or buy the cute eraser that I saw. But I’ve always just asked for the price, rarely did it. Throughout the 6 years, I’ve only gotten one notepad (misheard the price and paid 60 cents!) and one ice cream (I think it was 60 cents too). Any “big ticket” items that I really wanted, I worked hard to get straight Band 1s to “earn“ it from my mom :) In secondary school and JC, it was pretty much the same except I actually needed to spend money to build a social life - buying birthday presents for classmates, spending it on KFC after a half-day school even though I hate fast food because my classmates wanted to chill there, watching a movie with them during school holidays. Any idol CD or story books that I wanted, I wait till it’s MY birthday to get them from my friends lol. The saving habit from young continued but I picked up another habit - budgeting! In university, everything from secondary school and JC stayed the same except I was given much more allowance per month. I’ve never been given that much money openly by my folks but it’s to cover everything. After portioning out for transport and budgeting for food, shopping and school stuff (e.g. buying textbooks, printing notes) ended up in the same pool of funds after considering how much I wanted to save for the future. At that point of time, I also didn’t quite know what I needed to save for but I’ve only known that saving money and being thrifty are good traits. And if I ended up being jobless, I have some money to tide through. It was ”saving for the rainy days”. Now, after years of “I don’t want anything”, I finally have something that I want to buy - a house. Saving really hard for it so I’m now trying to learn how to investments to help speed things up. I’m thankful that I was taught how to save and budget, and also be thrifty. Hope I can win a pair of the tickets to attend the Seedly PFF 2019 so that I can really learn how to grow my money to buy a house!
  • Asked by Anonymous

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 02 Jan 2019
    1. Try to rationalise what you're feeling right now, where your lack of passion stems from; is it burn out? or do you truly don't enjoy playing the sport? 2. Also rationalise whether you want to take the sport professionally. Having passion for a sport doesn't necessarily mean that you want to develop it into a career for various reasons (e.g. you may think that it's not a healthy career because it's not easy to sustain it once you go beyond the peak). 3. Commnicate to your parents about Points 1 and 2. And also understand why they want you to take it professionally (other than that they've invested large amount of money in you for it). Also take this opportunity to let them know what you would like to do next (or let them know that you want to find something you would like to commit to, if you haven't figure this out). Communication is important, if not the key thing here. Make your voice heard but also remember that they may not necessarily agree with you. But even if they don't agree with you (yet), don't think that you're being ungrateful to want to move away from it. This is your future that we are talking about here. Putting it from another perspective - if you continue with hockey out of "gratefulness" to your parents but because of the lack of passion and interest in the sport anymore, you fail to perform to their expectation (and in this case, the coach's and other investors' expectations). In the worst case scenario, you may not even be able to stay on the team or any professional team, killing your own career too. At that point of time, what are you go to do?
  • Asked by Daniel Lee

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 21 Dec 2018
    14, if including the one beside the Seedly logo!
  • Asked by Daniel Lee

    Eveline Lau
    Eveline Lau
    Level 4. Prodigy
    Answered on 20 Dec 2018
    Pretty much this.
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