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Darryl Snow

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Darryl Snow

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Darryl Snow

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Darryl Snow
Darryl Snow
Level 2. Rookie
Answered on 16 Jul 2019
Sounds like an extremely conservative plan - not a bad thing when the markets are running on fumes as they are, or if you are approaching retirement age. Personally I wouldn't put 2/3 in a savings account or SSB - I would rather have the money actually working for me than wasting away, barely keeping ahead of inflation. P2P lending is on the other end of the scale - I consider my risk apetite to be high, but I wouldn't touch those even to balance out a conservative portfolio. An S&P500 ETF is a great plan, especially with a minimum $5k up front to minimize the impact of fees, but I'm feeling a consensus that we're in for some volatility over the coming months or years, so you'd have to be prepared to stomach that. I would put more into stocks, specifically dividend-paying stocks, and also bonds given your conservative profile. Monthly averaging in to the ETF sounds like a good plan (again, I would skip the savings account) but at $1000/month you're going to be paying a higher % in fees (still only around $5/month) to buy in, but that would be the case whether you're averaging into the ETF or into stocks/bonds. I guess it depends on how active you want to be - if you don't want to put in the time to research stocks and bonds before buying then the ETF is a good long-term, globally diversified option. You perhaps shouldn't limit yourself to one ETF though - the S&P500 is the sexy one that everyone knows about but there are plenty of other promising funds to explore. Bear in mind that dividends paid out by US companies are subject to a 30% dividend witholding tax (DWT), which means you may not reap as high rewards as a US investor on the same fund. If your heart is set on S&P500 then look for Irish-domiciled funds like iShares Core S&P 500 to reduce the tax to 15%, or otherwise look to funds in Singapore and Hong Kong (0% DWT), UK (10% DWT), Australia/Japan/Europe (15%). Try and get the most bang for your buck given that you'll be paying relatively higher fees for the smaller investments.

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Darryl Snow
Darryl Snow
Level 2. Rookie
Answered on 09 Jul 2019
You don’t give much info but those 3 options don’t seem like great ones to me, unless you’re old, rich, or both.

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Darryl Snow
Darryl Snow
Level 2. Rookie
Updated on 07 Jun 2019
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